Emerald Heights concerns | Letter

Emerald Heights concerns

The Emerald Heights concerns recently addressed in the Redmond Reporter are more widespread than just the neighborhood that it exists in. Like many of the neighborhoods on Education Hill, we are a residential neighborhood — R4 is our zoning. One of the most important codes for any residential neighborhood on the hill, as well as any other residential area, is the requirement that the atmosphere, aesthetics and general feel of the area be maintained.

The original approval for Emerald Heights in 1988 required that buildings be placed on the central area of the property to maintain a buffer of natural area between these uncharacteristic buildings from our single-family homes. When a project of this size is being considered, there are legal requirements on notifying residents. Part of that process includes forms, filled out by residents that include codes and regulations that are being violated. The city has dozens and dozens of legally rendered comments showing clearly that this proposal is in violation of city code.

Any of you who live in single-family neighborhoods, how would you like to have a nearly two-block-long building erected in your neighborhood, 30 feet tall, with a flat roof so it can be 30 feet of living space? It looks very much like an office building. It has stairway towers that will be lit at night. Outdoor lighting that will be on. Living facilities that will face the road with lighting as well. The boulevard feel of Abbey Road will be lost to this huge building looming over you as you walk or drive by.

If this project is approved, a dangerous precedent will be set. That would be the flagrant disregard of city building codes set to maintain our residential neighborhoods.

Redmond neighborhoods would be up for grabs! If the building code is changed, to remove the requirement that the aesthetics and atmosphere of our neighborhoods be preserved, buyer beware! I do not dislike older people, I am an older people! The claim that the need for this type of housing for older people is huge, is real. The thought that Emerald Heights can get anywhere close to meeting that need is simply a ploy. It is a business plan gone bad. I could offer additional facts, photos and information on this, but will let this sit on all who care about where they live.

Wendy Engquist

Redmond

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