Photo courtesy of the city of Redmond 
                                Siddhant Singh, 8, meets Mayor John Marchione to talk about his Beyblade tournament idea.

Photo courtesy of the city of Redmond Siddhant Singh, 8, meets Mayor John Marchione to talk about his Beyblade tournament idea.

Eight-year-old’s letter to mayor brings Beyblades to Redmond

Thanks to Siddhant Singh’s letter, there will be a Beyblades free play at Derby Days.

At Norman Rockwell Elementary School, Siddhant Singh received a class project from his teacher in February.

As part of a lesson on civic engagement, the 8-year-old chose to write a letter to Mayor John Marchione about an idea he wanted to see implemented in Redmond. Siddhant chose to write about his favorite interactive game Beyblade.

“I really enjoy playing Beyblade at my friend’s house but it would be better if we could have a tournament at Redmond Town Center once every year,” Siddhant wrote in his letter to the mayor. “One reason is because we can face people around the world. Another reason is we can make new friends. My last reason is we can be entertained. So please, let us have a Beyblade tournament.”

A few months later, Siddhant received a response from the mayor. Marchione responded with enthusiasm and invited Siddhant to connect with the producers of Derby Days to bring the first-ever Beyblade tournament to Redmond.

“Siddhant’s letter was more than hosting a Beyblade tournament,” Marchione said in a release. “It was about connecting the community and finding a common interest that can bring a diverse group of people together.”

In his letter, Marchione said a Beyblade tournament would fit perfectly with this year’s Derby Days theme, Game On!.

When Siddhant fist met the mayor he said he was nervous but excited that the mayor wanted to meet him. At Redmond City Hall, Siddhant explained what Beyblade is the best he could to Marchione.

Beyblade is a two-player or more game that has a line of spinning toys with the goal of knocking out the opponent’s beyblade. Each player receives three beyblades to use for battle in a match. The player with three points or the last player with their beyblade spinning wins.

Both Siddhant’s parents, Ramya Vaidehi and Ranveer Singh are excited that their son’s idea will come to fruition. They said they too had to learn how the game worked.

“It’s a testament of how Siddhant thinks differently,” Ranveer Singh said. “We were pleasantly surprised. We support him in that…We are just happy this opportunity has come up. Siddhant will have to work hard to convert that into a reality. Because of some initiative that he took, there might be a lot of children that will come together.”

Siddhant’s mother said she felt it was very important for this idea to happen since his idea will be turning into a reality.

After much planning and talking, the family and the city decided to host a free play on one of the days at Derby Days instead of tournament.

However, Siddhant’s parents believe this experience is going to be “very positive.” They said it will be memorable for him and it’s something he will remember his whole life.

Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo 
                                Siddhant Singh shows his 4-year-old brother how to use a beyblade.

Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo Siddhant Singh shows his 4-year-old brother how to use a beyblade.

From left: Ranveer, Samarth, Sihhdant, and Ramya Singh in their Redmond home. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

From left: Ranveer, Samarth, Sihhdant, and Ramya Singh in their Redmond home. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

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