I’m not ready yet | Senior Column

  • Friday, November 10, 2017 11:38am
  • Life

By Brad Breeding

Although the vast majority of people who live in continuing care retirement communities (CCRC) like Emerald Heights in Redmond report that they are happy with their decision, there are many who delay a move indefinitely because they feel they are not ready yet.

Of course, moving to a CCRC is an important decision. It requires appropriate planning and should not be rushed. Yet, delaying the decision too long could mean missing the opportunity because a common entry requirement among CCRCs is the ability to live independently. Furthermore, even if your health remains good, delaying means missing out on many of the benefits that such a community could provide for you in the first place.

Here are a few of the most common underlying reasons for not being ready:

“I don’t want to leave my home.” Leaving the home where you have lived for years, if not decades, is not easy. Your own home is a familiar environment and the memories you have built there will forever be cherished. But these are not necessarily the best reasons to stay in your home. Over time the idea of staying in the home often proves to be easier in theory than in practice for many older adults and their family members. Sometimes staying in the home means delaying a move later to an assisted living facility or nursing home, at a time when moving to an unfamiliar environment is even more challenging physically, emotionally and psychologically.

“I’m still independent.” Because continuing care retirement communities include assisted living and healthcare services on-site there is a common misperception that they are long-term care facilities. However, the majority of residents in most CCRCs live independently. In fact, many residents of CCRCs lead independent and active lifestyles for many years before ever requiring long-term care services. Yet, they also recognize that things can change unexpectedly. They want a plan in place and do not want to be a burden on their children whenever that day comes.

“I do not want to deal with the hassles of moving.” Moving and de-cluttering isn’t easy at any age but it will only become more difficult as you get older. If this is the main reason for your delay then it is better to make the move now rather than later. The process of de-cluttering can even be a special time to share with adult children or other family members as you dust off old family keepsakes together. Some retirement communities may even include moving and de-cluttering services as an added incentive to help make your move easier.

“I am not yet comfortable with the decision financially.” There are many resources available to help you determine whether a continuing care retirement community is a viable financial choice for you. Senior living financial calculators like DecisionGenie can help you run the numbers taking into accounts factors such as entry fees, monthly fees and cost of health-care services. Additionally, if you have a financial planner who is well-versed in CCRC contracts she should also be able to help. Finally, many CCRCs utilize actuarial software that helps them determine if your assets and income are adequate to cover your projected lifetime cost and they will usually share the results with you.

If you are considering a CCRC but feel that you are not quite ready to make the move, then it could be helpful to think about what “not ready” means for you. Addressing the underlying reasons sooner rather than later helps assure that you keep your options open and could spur important conversations about what is ultimately best for your long-term situation.

Content provided with express written permission from myLifeSite | www.mylifesite.net

More in Life

Plant a tree, make a difference on Green Redmond Day

Help plant trees on Saturday, Oct. 27.

Keynote speaker Jenny Lay-Flurrie, Microsoft’s Chief Accessibility Officer, spoke of creating technologies, workplaces, and communities that celebrate and harness the power of people of all abilities, and how she has found strength through her own disability. Madison Miller/staff photo.
Kindering raises more than $330,000 at annual luncheon

Kindering CEO retires after 40 years at the helm.

Fall into wellness

Simple tips for staying healthy this season.

The five-part series workshops will take place every Saturday leading to the event, from 1:00 - 2:30 p.m. at the Redmond Senior Center. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.
‘Thriller’ dance workshops in session

Teresa Osborne’s Thriller workshops begin in preparation for Thrill of the World

Shravya Kakulmarri shares about her experiences at the Hospital de Câncer de Barretos in Brazil and her goal to help decrease diabetes in Hispanic and Latino populations in Brownsville, Texas. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.
Local teens organize eighth annual TEDxYouth event

Nine speakers participated in TEDxYouth emphasizing on the theme, “Escaping the Echo Chamber” on Sept. 29.

Redmond’s Downtown Park is now open

The grand opening event included a ribbon cutting, community picnic, a performance by Lucia Neare’s Theatrical Wonders and more.

Improving supply helps slow escalating home prices

A look at the regional real estate market.

Moving Art Center hosts concert series at Downtown Park

There will be three performances for the next three Thursdays.

From left: Heather Johnston-Robinson, August Robinson and fellow student. Photo by Kristina Krug.
Rep. Suzan DelBene talks with local parents about what they think of the Summer Meals program that aims to help hungry children. Kailan Manandic/staff Photo
Rep. Suzan DelBene helps feed Kingsgate kids

DelBene handed out free lunches at the Kingsgate Library Summer Meals program.

Redmond, partners celebrate launch of new King County Community Court

New program aims to help low-level offenders by offering services and sanctions as an alternative to jail time.

Lieutenant Tim Gately visits with Peyton, a local kid at one of the 65 neighborhood block parties throughout Redmond. Kailan Manandic/Staff Photo
Redmond celebrates National Night out with 65 block parties

Police officers and firefighters toured around to meet with locals and support the community.