File photo

File photo

Candidate filing begins May 13

Residents will vote on Redmond council members, mayor and school board directors.

Candidate filing for the November election begins May 13 and individuals seeking a seat in Redmond City Council and Lake Washington School District have the opportunity to register to run for available positions.

Council Positions 1, 3, 5 and 7 — which are held by Hank Myers, Hank Margeson, Angela Birney and David Carson — are up for election.

Myers announced his candidacy for re-election for Pos. 1 earlier this month. According to a release, Myers stated he will help ensure Redmond improves “roads, keep taxes affordable, while protecting the community and environmental values” that are important to Redmond.

Running for Pos. 5 is first-time candidate Vanessa Kritzer. Kritzer is currently a planning commissioner, a board member for the Anti-Defamation League – Pacific Northwest and National Women’s Political Caucus of Washington. According to a release, Kritzer is running for City Council because she wants to “ensure that as Redmond grows it can continue to be a thriving, accessible, and inclusive community.”

Farshad Ansari will also run for council as a first-time candidate. Ansari is running for Pos. 7. Ansari stated he wants to be a voice for Redmond residents from all walks of life. His goal is to include everybody’s voice in every decision Redmond makes.

Redmond locals Varisha Khan and Henry Myers have also filed to campaign for positions on the council.

The mayor position is also up for election this year. Mayor John Marchione announced in January that he will not be running for re-election.

“This is a good time for me, professionally and personally, to pass the baton to the next elected official who will run the city,” Marchione said in a press release. “The city’s successes abound — new and improved parks, roads, trails, housing and community events. In 2023, Sound Transit light rail service will connect our residents and employees to the region. Now it is time for the city to engage the community in conversations to build Redmond’s 2050 vision and Comprehensive Plan to manage growth over the coming decades.”

Andrew Koeppen, a long-time Redmond resident, local real estate agent and business owner will run for mayor as a first-time candidate. Koeppen believes Redmond needs a city government in which ethics is ingrained into its culture, according to a release.

Councilmember Steve Fields announced that he will also run for mayor. Fields stressed in a release that integrity and accountability are expectations he will set for everyone who works in the city government.

Birney is also running for the mayor position. She announced her running in January. If elected mayor, Birney said she wants to increase affordable housing and transportation options.

On the Lake Washington School District board of directors, positions 1, 2, and 5, which are held by Eric Laliberte, Chris, Siri Bliesner are up for election.

Candidates must complete a declaration of candidacy and be registered to vote in the district.

See, www.kingcounty.gov/depts/elections.aspx for more.

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