City of Redmond participating in PSRC regional travel study

  • Wednesday, March 22, 2017 10:41am
  • News

The Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) is conducting a regional travel study to better understand the transportation needs and preferences of the region’s residents. Between March 2017 and June 2017, Redmond residents will receive invitations to participate in this important transportation study led by PSRC.

“This survey will provide us with a current overview of how Redmond residents get around and guide our transportation investments in the future,” said Hank Margeson, Redmond City Council president and PSRC’s vice chair of the Growth Management Policy Board.

Demand for travel in the Puget Sound region is expected to increase by 25 percent between now and the year 2040. Redmond’s participation in the study can help answer questions about how the city and the region can maintain and improve mobility, accessibility and connectivity for residents as the population grows and travel patterns evolve. The information collected will be vital for planning and prioritizing improvements for the Puget Sound region’s transportation system.

The study will help planners understand the travel behavior of real households, such as the trips people make to work, school, or shopping centers, to help decision makers prioritize transportation projects.

PSRC conducted similar studies in 2014 and 2015, so the 2017 study will provide up-to-date information and will also help planners understand changing needs over time. Redmond and Seattle are sponsoring extra data collection in their cities.

For more information on the PSRC travel study, visit https://survey.psrc.org.

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