Final Lake Washington School District counts in for February ballot

Final results are in from the February special election, which asked voters in the Lake Washington School District (LWSD) to vote on two levies and a bond measure.

Prop. 1, which would replace educational programs and the operations levy, was approved with 54.6 percent of the vote.

This levy would replace an expiring levy and decrease the district tax rate.

It funds staff for special education, highly capable and English learner programs as well as substitute teachers, nurses and transportation staff.

It would also fund a new teacher support program, additional learning days for staff and workshops.

Funding for athletic directors, coaches, trainers and advisers is also included in this levy.

Prop. 2 also passed with 55.2 percent of the vote.

This is another levy renewal designed to replace an expiring one with no tax rate increase.

It would fund HVAC systems, roofing, flooring, stadium turfs, portables, technology needs and classroom computers, among other items.

The final measure on the ballot was Prop. 3, which was a replacement bond resulting in no new tax increase.

It only gained 54 percent of the vote, well below the 60 percent it needed to pass.

It would have gone toward keeping facilities up to date and provide more space for the student body across the district, which has grown at a rate of around 700 new students annually in recent years.

The current enrollment for the district is around 29,600 students, making LWSD the third largest district in the state.

According to LWSD, schools are overcrowded and there is not enough classroom space to meet the needs of new students.

This has led to overcrowding in existing spaces, the addition of 171 portables with more on the way and ad-hoc classrooms being created.

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