Leading by example: Local forest stewards honored for environmental efforts

The City of Redmond recently held a Forest Steward Appreciation Picnic at Idylwood Beach Park in Redmond.

  • Monday, September 23, 2013 5:05pm
  • News

Marilynn Leland (left) and Jim Downing were honored at a Forest Steward Appreciation Picnic in Idylwood Beach Park in Redmond.

The City of Redmond recently held a Forest Steward Appreciation Picnic at Idylwood Beach Park in Redmond.

The event was organized by the Green Redmond Partnership to honor local volunteers for their environmental efforts on behalf of the city.

Marilynn Leland and Jim Downing were honored for a culmination of years of hard work and collaborative efforts put forth to ensure that Redmond’s park legacy and environmental health will continue to thrive for many seasons to come.

Downing, a Steward at Grass Lawn Park, said his experience working as a volunteer has both nurtured valuable partnerships with other citywide organizations and created opportunities to grow and learn on a personal level.

“A while back, when the City of Redmond sponsored a program in my park with the Native Plant Society,” he said. “It was an intensive, immersive experience and the knowledge I gained from it helped me acquire a better understanding of what was in the forest — what should be there, what shouldn’t be there — as well as planting applications. We’ve had so much support, and I couldn’t ask for a better volunteer organization.”

Redmond Mayor John Marchione, was also on hand at the evening’s festivities to honor the program pioneers and acknowledged that their influence transcends simple efforts at environmental upkeep.

“They are stewards of more than our forests,” he said. “Their hard work ensures that we retain our commitment to our open spaces — our forests, trails, streams and creeks; allowing natural habitats to survive. The combined hours they’ve devoted, which includes all volunteers participating in work parties led by all forest stewards — past and present — totals 5,914 hours. That’s remarkable.”

Leland, who serves as a co-steward for Viewpoint Park with fellow honoree Kaytlyn Sanders, said the experience creates an opportunity to not only preserve and ensure the vitality of the area’s natural environment, but also connect with other community members.

“There’s only so much funding, and if we don’t volunteer, things don’t get done,” Leland said. “I’ve made a commitment to this, but it just amazes me the number of people who will come out and give a few hours. Everyone has busy lives — and their own yard work. I think that’s pretty remarkable.”

To learn more about how to become a forest steward or to volunteer in one of Redmond’s parks, visit www.greenredmond.org.

More in News

King County’s $5 million derelict boat problem

When a boat sinks, it costs a lot to bring it up, with millions being spent since 2003 on removals.

Sexual misconduct reports triple following ‘Report it to Stop it’ campaign

Joint effort to curb unwanted harassment proves successful.

Candidates file for November 2019 election

Locals will vote on a variety of local and county positions.

Susan’s quest for ‘justice’ and the civil legal system dilemma

While citizens have the right to an attorney in criminal cases, they’re not afforded the same rights in civil litigation.

King County Councilman Reagan Dunn sent a letter to the FBI asking for them to help investigate Allan Thomas (pictured), who is under investigation for stealing more than $400,000 of public funds and skirting election laws in an Enumclaw drainage district. Screenshot from King 5 report
King County Council requests report on special districts in wake of fraud allegations

Small, local special districts will face more scrutiny following Enumclaw drainage district case.

More than 500 people came to enjoy country displays, food, games and conversation. Courtesy photo
Benjamin Rush Elementary celebrates 13th annual International Night

More than 500 people came to enjoy country displays, food, games and conversation.

The Marquee on Meeker Apartments, 2030 W. Meeker St. in Kent, will feature 492 apartments and 12,000 square feet of retail. The first phase of 288 apartments is expected to be completed in early 2020. Developers are targeting people in their 20s and 30s to rent their high-end, urban-style apartments. Steve Hunter/staff photo
Housing study pokes holes in conventional wisdom

High construction and land costs will incentivize developers to build luxury units.

File photo
Eviction reform passed by state Legislature

Tenant protections included longer notices and more judicial discretion.

Most Read