New agreements approved to provide better services to unincorporated King County

Local Services now has four service partnership agreements with other county departments.

King County’s newest department, Local Services now has four service partnership agreements with other county departments that will serve unincorporated King County.

The four partnership agreements were approved by the King County Executive Cabinet on Jan. 22.

The approved agreements include the Department of Natural Resources and Parks – parks division; Department of Natural Resources and Parks – surface water management program, stormwater services; Regional Animal Services of King County; Public Health – Seattle and King County – environmental health services division, on-site septic system, and plumbing and gas piping.

The Department of Local Services and the four departments agree to collaborate on performance tracking and monitoring; strategies to advance King County that enhance efficiency and effectiveness to service delivery, improve fiscal sustainability of services, and implement comprehensive plan policies.

“The agreements put us on the same page with data sharing, creating public improvements, and aligning services,” said Local Services director John Taylor in a release. “This will allow us to better coordinate our resources and work more effectively with the communities we serve.”

Taylor added that through these new agreements, the department will be able to respond more quickly and be more accountable on issues that affect residents and businesses outside city limits.

Local Services will spend the next year creating similar agreements with other service providers and work with other non-King County service providers to create partnerships that could benefit residents and businesses. They will also continue working towards improving their existing agreements as needed.

King County councilmember and chair of the department Kathy Lambert added that she is excited to continue working with the Department of Local Services to better serve the residents of unincorporated King County

To further read the agreements, visit the county’s website at www.king.county.gov.

More in News

Gov. Jay Inslee speaks to protesting nurses on April 24 at the State Capitol Building in Olympia. Inslee indicated he would sign the bill for meal and rest breaks into law if it passes both chambers. Photo by Emma Epperly, WNPA Olympia News Bureau
Lawmakers approve ‘nursing bill’ for mandatory meal and rest breaks

Nurses show up in Olympia to support bill, protest Sen. Walsh’s remarks.

Scott Barden stands next to the pit that will house the newest, and possibly final, section of the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill near Maple Valley. The pit is 120 feet deep, and around another 180 feet will be built on top of it over the next decade. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
King County’s landfill is going to get bigger

A ninth cell will be built, extending its life by another decade.

An aircraft is pictured at King County International Airport, also known as Boeing Field. Photo courtesy of kingcounty.gov
King County wants to end deportation flights for ICE

Legal challenge expected from federal government.

April 2019 special election preliminary results

LWSD levy passing; Fall City fire merger and hospital bond coming up short.

King County Council gives the go-ahead for parks levy

Voters will be asked to decide whether to approve the levy on Aug. 6.

Toddler window falls are preventable

A demonstration provided parents with ways to protect children.

Jim Pitts stands on walkway overlooking filtration chambers at the King County South Filtration Plant in Renton. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Human waste: Unlikely climate change hero?

King County treatment plant joins effort to counteract effects of carbon dioxide.

Most Read