Hopelink will open its new flagship center in Redmond to clients on Aug. 6. Photo courtesy of Kris Betker

Hopelink will open its new flagship center in Redmond to clients on Aug. 6. Photo courtesy of Kris Betker

New Hopelink facility to open in Redmond

The facility will house Hopelink’s administrative team, Redmond client services staff and food bank.

Hopelink Redmond, the social services agency’s first permanent home base on the Eastside, will open to clients on Aug. 6.

The new center aims to make services more accessible and welcoming. The site, at 8990 154th Ave. N.E., is on a King County Metro Rapid Bus Line and close to the Together Center in downtown Redmond, making it “an ideal location,” according to Hopelink’s website.

After more than 25 years of serving the low-income community in Redmond in leased spaces, Hopelink broke ground for its new flagship center 15 months ago.

Hopelink has been serving north and east King County since 1971, helping people gain stability and the tools and skills needed to exit poverty.

Hopelink Redmond is the largest project to be funded by Hopelink’s multi-year capital campaign (Campaign for Lasting Change). Additional support was provided by the state of Washington and the city of Redmond, according to Kris Betker, senior public relations specialist for Hopelink.

The 28,000-square-foot, $14.2 million facility will house Hopelink’s administrative team and Redmond client services staff and food bank. This will enable Hopelink to vacate two leased facilities in Redmond. The new location will initially serve about 4,000 people every year, with a goal of helping 5,000 clients annually by 2020.

The more energy efficient building will lower operating costs, and enable Hopelink “to continue to provide essential services to those in need well into the future,” according to its website.

Hopelink’s newest facility will be a permanent home for the services it has provided to Redmond residents since 1990, from food, emergency financial help and heating assistance to the skill-building opportunities designed to give participants the tools they need to exit poverty.

These services — including case management, employment services, GED classes, English for work classes and financial coaching — are currently offered at Hopelink’s facility on Cleveland Street in downtown Redmond.

Hopelink continues to help more than 63,000 people each year with programs for food, housing, adult education, transportation, energy assistance, financial assistance, family development and employment services. Service centers are also located in Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline and Sno-Valley (Carnation).

All five centers include food banks, and each provides additional food for kids on summer break, as well as backpacks with school supplies in the fall, Betker said. In December, Hopelink offers holiday toy and gift rooms.

A grand opening celebration set for Aug. 3 will feature tours, a ribbon cutting and remarks from Lt. Gov. Cyrus Habib, Congresswoman Suzan DelBene and King County Executive Dow Constantine.

See hopelink.org for more.

The 28,000-square-foot, $14.2 million facility will house Hopelink’s administrative team, along with its Redmond client services staff and food bank.

The 28,000-square-foot, $14.2 million facility will house Hopelink’s administrative team, along with its Redmond client services staff and food bank.

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