New lead provisions earns praise from environmental groups

  • Friday, August 4, 2017 12:32pm
  • News

A new provision in the recently passed state budget relating to lead content in water is receiving praise from environmental groups.

The provision directs the Washington state Department of Health to develop a guidance program for schools to take action whenever lead in water exceeds one part per billion.

In a press release from Environment Washington and WashPIRG, Director Bruce Speight said the measure was positive for children.

“There is no safe level of lead for our children,” he said in the release. “This measure brings us one step closer to ensuring safe drinking water for Washington’s children.”

According to the release, evidence suggests that lead affects children’s health at very low levels and can cause learning disabilities.

Lead is a neurotoxin and children are more susceptible than adults to negative effects due to exposure.

Two of the state’s three largest schools, Seattle and Tacoma school districts, have found lead in the water at some of their schools, the release said.

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