Jeralee Anderson being sworn in. Contributed by the City of Redmond

Jeralee Anderson being sworn in. Contributed by the City of Redmond

Redmond City Council members sworn in on Tuesday

Three members of the new Redmond City Council were sworn in on Tuesday at City Hall.

Tanika Padhye, Steve Fields and Jeralee Anderson all took their oaths in the council chambers. Their terms will run through December 2021.

It marked the culmination of the November elections, which saw local races retain a much more civil tone than elections on the national level.

Padhye was selected as a replacement council member at the beginning of 2017 to fill a spot vacated by a previous member.

She ran for election and beat out Eugene Zakhareyev for the position 4 seat.

Padhye has served on both the city’s Planning and Parks and Trails commissions.

She is an attorney with experience working as a civil rights investigator dealing with employment and housing discrimination.

Padhye is a 14-year Redmond resident.

Fields ran against incumbent Byron Shutz, who was elected in the 2013 election for the position 2 seat and served four years.

Fields has been a Redmond resident for more than 30 years and has worked in the executive office of both King County and the City of Seattle.

He also owns a small business with his wife.

Anderson ran against Jason Antonelli, and secured a seat on the council in position 6.

Anderson holds a doctorate in sustainability from the University of Washington’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

She is the CEO of the Greenroads Foundation, which is a nonprofit located in Redmond. She has lived in the city for seven years.

All the new council members have said they will make addressing issues like housing affordability and traffic congestion top priorities.

Tanika Padhye being sworn in. Contributed by the City of Redmond

Tanika Padhye being sworn in. Contributed by the City of Redmond

Steve Fields being sworn in. Contributed by the City of Redmond.

Steve Fields being sworn in. Contributed by the City of Redmond.

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