Redmond Police Chief Kristi Wilson will retire after 32 years of public service on June 7. Courtesy of the city of Redmond

Redmond Police Chief Kristi Wilson will retire after 32 years of public service on June 7. Courtesy of the city of Redmond

Redmond Police Chief Wilson to retire after 32 years in law enforcement

Her last day will be June 7.

  • Friday, April 12, 2019 11:49am
  • News

On June 7, Redmond Police Chief Kristi Wilson will retire after 32 years of public service.

Wilson has spent the last 26 years with the Redmond Police Department (RPD) and was appointed as chief in 2016 and most recently has also been serving as the interim public works director.

“I am honored to have served the Redmond community for the last 26 years and am proud to have been a part of such a progressive and innovative police department,” Wilson stated in a city press release. “I will carry the personal connections I have made within the department, community and the region with me as I begin this next chapter in my life.”

Wilson began her law enforcement career at the Anacortes Police Department and transferred to Redmond as an officer in 1993. Wilson has a bachelor of arts degree in sociology from Central Washington University, a master’s in organizational leadership from Gonzaga University and is a 2012 graduate of the FBI National Academy.

“Kristi’s legacy is the strong personal connection that the Redmond Police Department has fostered with community members and groups under her leadership,” Redmond Mayor John Marchione said in the release. “Her recent award from the Muslim Community and Neighborhood Association for her work in strengthening the relationship between RPD and Redmond’s Muslim and immigrant neighbors is representative of her commitment and loyalty to the entire Redmond community.”

The national recruitment process for the new Redmond police chief will begin in May. During this time, Fire Chief Tommy Smith will serve as the public safety director, overseeing both the police and fire departments. Deputy fire chief Don Horton will step in as the interim fire chief and city chief operating officer Maxine Whattam will support the Public Works Department while the recruitment process for that director comes to a close.

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