Tall ships visit Port Ludlow for sailings, tours

PORT LUDLOW — History will come alive in Port Ludlow this weekend as the tall ships Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain make their return trip to Port Ludlow Marina.

The vessels will be docked at the marina at 1 Heron Road.

The tall ships, part of the nonprofit Grays Harbor Historical Seaport, sail the waters of the Pacific each year offering educational programs, free deck tours and sailing excursions.

Tours for $5 will be available from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. today and from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

The tall ships also will be open to the general public for a ticketed Adventure Sail, Battle Sail, and a special Mother’s Day Sail on Sunday.

Battle Sail is scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday and tickets are $42 to $79. An Adventure Sail is slated for 11 a.m. Sunday and tickets are $49. Battle Sail is scheduled for 2 p.m. Sunday and tickets are $79. Participants can buy one ticket for one of the sails on Sunday and bring their mothers for just $5 each.

Tickets are available for purchase at https://tinyurl.com/PDNships.

The ships will be closed Monday and are scheduled to depart Tuesday.

Launched in 1989 in Aberdeen, Lady Washington is the official ambassador of the state of Washington and a replica of the original vessel of the same name, the first American ship to make landfall on the West Coast. The steel-hulled Hawaiian Chieftain was launched in 1988 in Lahaina, Hawaii. Together they are among the most active tall ships in America, visiting approximately 40 ports each year.

Grays Harbor Historical Seaport is an educational nonprofit based in Aberdeen.

In addition to school programs and public sailing, the tall ships are also active sail training vessels.

Anyone over age 16 is eligible to join the crew through the Two Weeks Before the Mast volunteer sailing program.

Those pursuing careers in the commercial maritime industry can also consider enrolling in the Historical Seaport’s Sea School Northwest, a job training program to provide knowledge and mentorship for professional maritime fields.

For information about the tall ships and their programs, visit www.historicalseaport.org or call 800-200-5239.

This story was first published in the Peninsula Daily News.

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