Redmond’s Reetu Gupta started Cirkled in two years ago. Courtesy photo

Redmond’s Reetu Gupta started Cirkled in two years ago. Courtesy photo

Gupta dialed in to students’ needs with Cirkled in

Reetu Gupta sees changes on the horizon for the way colleges seek out and recruit new students, so she designed a platform she hopes will help both students and institutions of higher learning.

Gupta is a Redmond resident who has two children, and a few years ago when one of her children, then 10 years old, was applying to a school, her daughter’s projects and certificates took Gupta three weeks to find and compile.

She said there had to be a better way for students to organize their achievements and present themselves to schools or organizations in an easier way, so in 2015, she started Cirkled in.

Cirkled in is basically a service where students can upload documents, achievements, certificates, projects and community service experience onto a profile.

Despite its name, which is similar to a popular networking website for adults, Cirkled in is not a networking site.

Instead, Gupta said it is a portal and online portfolio. So far, she has around two dozen organizations using the portal and is in talks with universities who could use it as a recruiting tool as well as a way students could submit materials to admissions offices.

“Now we are moving up the ladder, if you will, and we are going straight to students, and then once we have critical student mass, we can go to the colleges,” she said.

Colleges and universities send around 25 communications to students ever year of high school in an effort to attract new students, Gupta said. She hopes Cirkled in could help reduce and consolidate that figure.

With any service used by teens and children, security is always a concern, and Gupta said this was built into the product.

Profiles can be kept secret and can be selected not to show up in web searches.

The need for a product like hers is growing, Gupta said, as colleges have begun taking a more holistic view of how they select and approve students for their colleges.

Gupta said this is a welcome change as many skills and qualities students possess can’t be measured in a standard test.

“It is a step in the right direction, except I don’t think our students or families or sometimes even schools are ready for that,” she said.

Gupta said Cirkled in is a step into the 21st century for how colleges and students interact.

While Cirkled in is still ramping up, Gupta said she is no stranger to the startup and business scene in the area. She has worked for a variety of companies in a wide range of roles, including lead project managers.

Even though she works for herself now, Gupta said instead of having one boss, she has hundreds now.

“If you think you can be your own boss, that’s a myth, there is no such thing,” she said.

Gupta said she puts in between 80 and 100 hours a week as she gets the business off the ground.

While it’s a lot of work, Gupta said she’s good for it.

“At some point you say, hey, I want to make a bigger dent in the universe,” she said.

Visit Cirkled in at https://www.cirkledin.com/


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@redmond-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.redmond-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in Business

Images of dishes from Issaquah’s Umi Cafe posted on the SMORS page. (Photo courtesy of Kristen Ho)
Facebook page promotes minority-owned restaurants across Puget Sound region

Miya Nazzaro used to be a member of Facebook pages that were… Continue reading

The Moe Vegan food truck serves meals at the city of Kent’s annual Community Thanksgiving Dinner on Nov. 21, 2020. Sound Publishing file photo
King County fire marshals offer regulatory relief to food trucks

39 fire authorities have reportedly agreed to standardize fire codes and inspections.

Cash Cards Unlimited partners, left: Nick Nugwynne, right: Cassius Marsh (photo credit: Cash Cards Unlimited)
Former Seahawks player Cassius Marsh cashes in on trading cards

Marsh and his friend open physical and online trading card store as collectibles boom amid pandemic.

Teaser
First large-scale, human composting facility in the world will open in Auburn

“It’s what nature meant us to do. We just do it faster.”

Mayuri International Foods partners, left: Mahidhar Reddy center: Neeraj Poudyal right: Ramesh Bachala (photo credit: Cameron Sheppard)
Mayuri International Foods grocery store to open in Redmond Town Center

The store will include a unique produce selection and an extensive menu of prepared hot foods.

“You stay, we pay,” promotion (photo credit: Bullseye Creative)
The city of Redmond wants to pay you to stay there

New tourism promotion will give $100 gift certificates for local businesses to guests at 8 hotels.

Whole Foods grocery store entrance (Shutterstock)
King County considers grocery store worker hazard pay for those in unincorporated areas

The King County Metropolitan Council will vote during its next meeting on… Continue reading

Screenshot
WA Democrats consider new tax on billionaires

Plan could raise $5 billion from fewer than 100 taxpayers. Detractors fear it could drive Washington’s wealthiest out of state.

Last summer, people took advantage of the outdoor dining along First Avenue between Gowe and Titus streets in downtown Kent. In Phase 2 of the governor’s reopening plan, which was announced Jan. 28, restaurants can reopen at a maximum 25% capacity and a limit of six people per table. Photo courtesy of Kent Downtown Partnership
Restaurant reprieve: State to relax some indoor restrictions

On Monday, area restaurants and certain entertainment venues may resume indoor service, the governor said.

Stock photo
State Senate passes $1.7 billion in unemployment insurance tax relief

Targets relief to the most affected businesses; helps low-wage workers by raising their benefits

Jason Wilson is a James Beard Award-winning chef and owner of The Lakehouse in Bellevue. Courtesy photo
James Beard Award winner wants to cook with you – virtually

Chef Jason Wilson can give customers an interactive dining experience in their own homes.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer. Courtesy photo
Car review: 2021 Chevrolet Blazer

By Larry Lark, contributor When it comes to certain car models they… Continue reading