Redmond resident Timothy Sharpe is the owner of the new Graces 5 restaurant

Redmond resident Timothy Sharpe is the owner of the new Graces 5 restaurant

New Graces 5 restaurant in downtown Redmond offers diners healthy options

Diners in Redmond now have a new, healthy option when considering where to eat. Graces 5 at 8110 164th Ave. N.E. in downtown Redmond opened last month and offers a menu of gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free and low-sugar items for vegans, vegetarians and meat eaters alike.

Diners in Redmond now have a new, healthy option when considering where to eat.

Graces 5 at 8110 164th Ave. N.E. in downtown Redmond opened last month and offers a menu of gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free and low-sugar items for vegans, vegetarians and meat eaters alike.

Founder Timothy Sharpe said he wants his restaurant to be a safe place to eat for people with all types of dietary needs.

“We offer this place where people can eat together,” the Redmond resident said.

Sharpe explained that when dining out, people will pick a restaurant where everyone in the party can eat. If one individual has special dining needs — whether for health, ethical or other reasons — the group will go somewhere that person can eat. He said this is fine once or twice, but after a while, it gets old.

Graces 5, with a tag line of “Revolutionizing healthy eating,” offers vegetarian, vegan, meat and seafood dishes to please everyone’s palate.

In addition to being educated on food allergies and other dietary health issues, Sharpe said Graces 5 staff are trained to know about various diets such as the South Beach and Paleo diets, so they are able to have a real conversation with diners and their needs. He said customers can also fill out a profile card with their dietary specifications. This is put into the restaurant’s system, so when the customers return, their information is already on file.

The concept for Graces 5 came to Sharpe after he beat testicular cancer twice and his daughter beat leukemia at the age of 3.

“We as a family, in order to stay healthy, decided to change our diet,” he said.

They began with going organic and then gluten free, dairy free and soy free. Sharpe soon discovered others within the community whose diets were similar to his family’s and that usually ate at home because there weren’t any places that catered to their needs.

Sharpe had experienced this isolation when he was diagnosed with cancer the second time. He had chosen the Gerson Therapy, an alternative home-based treatment to chemotherapy and radiation that consists of a juicing protocol and raw and cooked solid foods. During this time, he said it was easy to become a hermit because there weren’t very many dining options in the community that catered to his dietary needs.

Sharpe opened Graces 5 because he wanted to provide an option for diners that was “not a place where you cheat on your diet.”

In the few weeks that the restaurant has been open, Sharpe has been spoken with customers and said he particularly enjoys hearing how happy they are to have a place to eat where they don’t have to worry about their health and can speak with the staff openly about their needs.

Graces 5 chef Ricky Simone has watched the healthy food movement grow for years and said he is glad to be a part of it.

“It’s very exciting,” he said.

Simone’s background is in Italian cuisine and said it’s been fun to realize that although he’s using different products, he’s using many of the same preparation techniques.

“You can’t tell the difference,” he said.

Some of the alternative ingredients Simone uses include gluten-free breadcrumbs, gluten-free pasta and organic produce and margarine. He said his favorite part of the job is being able to cook the same things he’s always cooked, but do it in a healthier way.

However, Simone said using alternative ingredients comes at a high price — literally. One of the biggest challenges he faces is finding gluten-free breads and pastas that are cost efficient but still fit the dietary needs of their diners.

In addition to healthier ingredients, Graces 5 also focuses on using as many local and seasonal ingredients as possible to support individuals and businesses in his community. They have even started an urban “Garden of Eatin'” around the restaurant parking lot, featuring vegetables and herbs to be used in the seasonal menu. Sharpe said this is another way to emphasize the idea of eating local.

And living about five minutes away from the restaurant, Sharpe said he has also become a patron of the businesses surrounding Graces 5.

“This is my town,” he said.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@redmond-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.redmond-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in Business

Joanna Paul and her son. Courtesy of Sleepy Little Nugget.
Sleepy Little Nugget helps new parents and babies sleep better

Joanna Paul started her business when she noticed a lack of sleep support classes as a new mother.

A heatmap showing the inclusivity of each state, which is based on the total Business Climate Score. The green states are the most inclusive, while the red are least inclusive; yellow and orange fall in the middle. Courtesy of Out Leadership.
Washington ranks 13th in State LGBTQ+ Business Climate Index

Washington’s lowest score was 13 out of 20 points in the Work Environment and Employment section.

Governor Jay Inslee is showed the construction site of Kirkland’s new Google campus (Courtesy of Google)
Google introduces new campus at Kirkland Urban

Also announces plans to invest more than $100 million in Washington state in 2022.

Courtesy of Bridget Howley.
Former CEO to speak on “Small Business: The Good, Bad & Ugly”

Mark Howley will speak about small business ownership on May 4 at River Trail Roasters.

Courtesy of SoulFood CoffeeHouse.
SoulFood CoffeeHouse starts a fundraiser amid COVID-19 challenges

The goal is to get rid of the debt that was taken on during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The “Mini-O” is a miniature outdoor office built to be easily relocated. Courtesy photo
Kirkland, Redmond businesses among those at 2022 Seattle Home and Garden Show

Event runs Feb. 26 to March 6 at the Lumen Field Event Center.

Robert Toomey, CFA/CFP, is Vice President of Research for S. R. Schill & Associates on Mercer Island.
Volatility and disciplined planning in 2022’s stock market | Guest column

The stock market in January experienced significantly increased volatility. In the first… Continue reading

Snoqualmie Casino. Courtesy photo
Kirkland-based company sues to challenge ‘tribal gaming monopoly’ in Washington

Company called the state’s policy an “erroneous application of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act.”

Robert Toomey, CFA/CFP, is Vice President of Research for S. R. Schill & Associates on Mercer Island.
The forces behind our current COVID-induced inflation | Guest column

Recent inflation numbers have been quite high and at levels not seen… Continue reading

Robert Toomey, CFA/CFP, is Vice President of Research for S. R. Schill & Associates on Mercer Island.
The ‘year end’ elements of financial planning | Guest column

With the end of the year fast approaching, we remind clients that… Continue reading

Robert Toomey, CFA/CFP, is Vice President of Research for S. R. Schill & Associates on Mercer Island.
How financial planners address plan uncertainty | Guest column

One of the key challenges we face as financial planners is dealing… Continue reading