Safety comes first for downtown business: Essco Safety Check tests for harmful products

Heirloom toys, dishes, cookware or jewelry — or new consumer products — can harbor harmful levels of lead, cadmium, arsenic, mercury or other elements. How do you know what’s safe to use in your home, especially if you have young children?

Essco Safety Check president Seth Goldberg will be offering free testing to check the makeup of any household goods between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. May 12-15 at his downtown location.

Essco Safety Check president Seth Goldberg will be offering free testing to check the makeup of any household goods between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. May 12-15 at his downtown location.

Heirloom toys, dishes, cookware or jewelry — or new consumer products — can harbor harmful levels of lead, cadmium, arsenic, mercury or other elements.

How do you know what’s safe to use in your home, especially if you have young children?

Essco Safety Check, 15906 NE 83rd St. in downtown Redmond, will offer free testing to check the elemental makeup of any household goods, between 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, May 12-15. Using laboratory-grade, handheld, X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzers, testing experts can detect the presence and quantity (in parts per million) of potential toxins within an item that you and your loved ones use every day. At the free testing events, a limit of five items per person applies.

Each test takes less than a minute and is non-destructive to the item, said Essco Safety Check president Seth Goldberg and his brother, CEO Arin Goldberg.

The XRF tool has primarily been utilized by organizations such as HUD (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development), the EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency), CPSC (Consumer Safety Product Commission) and in industries such as metal fabricating and mining.

But on a consumer level, such testing had led to recalls of products such as children’s toys or bedding.

In an interview with the Redmond Reporter, Seth pointed out some baby blocks and stacking rings that had obviously been gnawed by some teething toddlers — and unfortunately, were found to be unsafe. But it’s hard to know whether all such products should be recalled. Sometimes the problem is limited to particular colors or batches of toys.

The Goldbergs said their mission is not to scare parents or daycare providers but to use the XRF in “a commonsense, practical, preventative way.”

Seth noted, “We want to help moms and dads test what (their kids) play with, eat off, sleep on, so they can find problem items and remove them from their environment.”

Federal laws are especially focused on making sure that products for children 12 and under can not contain lead. Lead paint was banned in 1978 because of its known health hazards.

But even products which may have been safe at the time of manufacturing — for instance, coffee mugs, pots or pans — can become unsafe due to wear-and-tear, scratching or leeching from acidic foods. If in doubt, you may want to check on such items.

XRF testing can also provide many jobs because of its low cost and quick turn-around time, the Goldbergs said. It’s especially beneficial to small business owners, so they can be assured that their products comply with safety standards.

In a formal testing situation, clients would receive a written report regarding the makeup of the product. At the free testing sessions May 12-15, only verbal results will be given.

Also during the free testing events, visitors can purchase pre-paid punch cards to have additional products analyzed, schedule in-home or commercial inspections or register for door prizes.

A grand opening, ribbon-cutting ceremony, with visits from members of the Greater Redmond Chamber of Commerce and officials from the City of Redmond, will take place at Essco Safety Check at 4 p.m. Tuesday, May 12.

For more information, call (425) 749-4136 or visit www.essco-safetycheck.com.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@redmond-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.redmond-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in Business

Robert Toomey, CFA/CFP, is Vice President of Research for S. R. Schill & Associates on Mercer Island.
How financial planners address plan uncertainty | Guest column

One of the key challenges we face as financial planners is dealing… Continue reading

Mixologist and general manager of Civility & Unrest, Joe Dietrich (photo by Cameron Sheppard)
If you want a regular cocktail, go somewhere else

Master mixologist Joe Dietrich is elevating cocktail culture at Bellevue’s Civility & Unrest.

Robert Toomey, CFA/CFP, is Vice President of Research for S. R. Schill & Associates on Mercer Island.
Is cryptocurrency really an investment? | Guest column

Undoubtedly you have heard about the new form of money known as… Continue reading

Front bar at Bellevue’s Civility & Unrest (courtesy of Civility & Unrest)
Two of James Beard Award-winning chef Jason Wilson’s restaurants to reopen in October

The Lakehouse plans to reopen Oct. 12 and Civility & Unrest reopens Oct. 14.

Stock photo
Grocery store workers have right to wear Black Lives Matter buttons

National Labor Relations Board ruling against ban by Kroger-owned QFC, Fred Meyer

Big Island Poke in Renton (courtesy of The Intentionalist Facebook page)
Small-business advocacy group wants you to try minority-owned businesses and put it on their tab

The Intentionalist is opening up $400 tabs for folks to use this weekend at select businesses.

Eastside King County restaurant owners discuss challenges with U.S. Rep Suzan DelBene at Pomegranate Bistro in Redmond. (Photo credit: Cameron Sheppard/Sound Publishing)
Restaurant owners discuss labor difficulties with U.S Rep. Suzan DelBene

Experienced service and kitchen staff are reportedly hard to hire as food service reopens.

Dave and Buster's restaurant and entertainment venue looks to hire 130 people to staff its Bellevue venue, set to open in August. Photo courtesy Dave and Busters.
Dave and Buster’s hiring 130 for August opening in Bellevue

Dave and Buster’s restaurant and entertainment venue opens in downtown Bellevue on… Continue reading

Images of dishes from Issaquah’s Umi Cafe posted on the SMORS page. (Photo courtesy of Kristen Ho)
Facebook page promotes minority-owned restaurants across Puget Sound region

Miya Nazzaro used to be a member of Facebook pages that were… Continue reading

The Moe Vegan food truck serves meals at the city of Kent’s annual Community Thanksgiving Dinner on Nov. 21, 2020. Sound Publishing file photo
King County fire marshals offer regulatory relief to food trucks

39 fire authorities have reportedly agreed to standardize fire codes and inspections.

Cash Cards Unlimited partners, left: Nick Nugwynne, right: Cassius Marsh (photo credit: Cash Cards Unlimited)
Former Seahawks player Cassius Marsh cashes in on trading cards

Marsh and his friend open physical and online trading card store as collectibles boom amid pandemic.

Teaser
First large-scale, human composting facility in the world will open in Auburn

“It’s what nature meant us to do. We just do it faster.”