Working Mother magazine names Microsoft among 100 Best Companies

Redmond-based Microsoft Corp. has been named one of Working Mother magazine’s 100 Best Companies for 2009.

Across all industries, the Working Mother 100 Best Companies lead the way in pioneering programs that support families, with 100 percent offering flextime, on-site lactation rooms and telecommuting; and 98 percent offering job-sharing and wellness programs — numbers that dwarf those seen nationwide. In addition, financial programs available to the 100 Best Companies employees are on the rise, providing a much needed boost for families in today’s economy. These include tuition reimbursement, retirement planning and pre-tax FSAs for childcare.

According to a Microsoft spokesperson, Microsoft offers many programs that support working mothers when their normal child care is not available. These include a national back-up child care program supported by hundreds of centers across the U.S., sick child care and in-home, back-up child care options.

Microsoft also offers a “Schools Out!” program that employees are able to utilize when school is out and parents have to work. In addition, there are summer programs sponsored by Microsoft, that children of employees can attend.

In every Microsoft building, including around 100 in the Puget Sound area, there is a new mother’s room (lactation room) to facilitate breast-feeding.

Job-sharing programs are available for working mothers and all Microsoft employees are eligible for tuition reimbursement, up to $7,500 for graduate level coursework and $5,250 per year for undergraduate level coursework.

In a press release, Carol Evans, president of Working Mother Media stated, “The Best 100 (Companies) provide leadership where and when we need it most, furnishing a framework for working families during good times and bad. If all companies adopted these best practices, more families could weather the economic storm.”

Suzanne Riss, editor-in-chief of Working Mother magazine, commented, “Now more than ever, our readers and all working mothers need the support of their employers. By offering benefits like paid maternity leave, the ability to work from home and wellness programs, as well as programs that enhance financial well-being, our 100 Best are helping to reduce stress in the busy lives of working moms. These companies epitomize family-friendly support at its best.

For more information about Working Mother’s 100 Best Companies, visit www.workingmother.com/bestcompanies.




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