Photo courtesy of Leslie Funk 
                                Morten Joslin was a captain and a fighter pilot in the U.S. Air Force during WWII.

Photo courtesy of Leslie Funk Morten Joslin was a captain and a fighter pilot in the U.S. Air Force during WWII.

Fairwinds-Redmond to honor veterans

WWII veterans Morten Joslin and Nick Nichols share their stories.

It was 1941 and Morten Joslin was working on his 1929 Ford Model A, when his father ran over to tell him that the Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor and the United States was at war.

Sitting on a dark green couch next to his wife at Fairwinds-Redmond, Joslin, 95, shared the story of how he became a captain and fighter pilot in the U.S. Air Force during World War II.

Joslin was only 17 when his father had told him of the attack. Living in Tacoma at the time, Joslin said he wanted to join the Canadian Air Force immediately, as they took younger enlistees but his father said no. Joslin waited a year until he turned 18 to be enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps Air Cadet program.

Joslin signed the papers in 1942 to join the army and in 1943, he took a train from King Street Station in Seattle to basic training in Santa Ana, California. During his time in training camp, Joslin remembers New York Yankees baseball player, Joe DiMaggio coming to lead an exercise class.

“That got everyone stimulated,” he said.

After training in Santa Ana, Joslin was selected to go to primary flight school in Hemet, California, where he trained for about six months. And in a 10-day leave between training and before being sent to war zone in the Pacific, Joslin returned to Wyoming to marry his high school sweetheart, Alma. The two met in their hometown in Wyoming.

Joslin flew many missions and was stationed in locations like the jungles of New Guinea, Manila, Philippines, and around the world. Joslin flew the Lockheed P-38 Lightning during the war, which was feared by German and Japanese pilots. He also flew the P-51 — better known as the Mustang — which was a single-engine fighter aircraft that could escort heavy bomber formations. Joslin said he liked flying the Mustang.

After his service, Joslin returned to Seattle and received a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Washington. Joslin and his wife Alma have been married for 75 years and they have three children.

To honor veterans, Fairwinds-Redmond will be hosting a friendly game of bean-bag baseball on Veterans Day, which is Monday. Joslin will join other veterans including, Nick Nichols, another WWII Veteran. Nichols served in the war, with the Marine Corps. Nichols and his wife Phyllis have been at the retirement community for nearly two years.

The bean-bag baseball game will be followed by a Veterans Day celebration during which they will showcase memorabilia of their days in the armed forces, including medals and photographs.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@redmond-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.redmond-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo 
                                Morten Joslin, 95, holds a picture of himself during WWII.

Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo Morten Joslin, 95, holds a picture of himself during WWII.

Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo 
                                Morten Joslin and his wife Alma have been married for 75 years and reside at Fairwinds, a retirement community in Redmond.

Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo Morten Joslin and his wife Alma have been married for 75 years and reside at Fairwinds, a retirement community in Redmond.

Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo 
                                Nick Nichols is a WWII Veteran and resides at Fairwinds, a retirement community in Redmond.

Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo Nick Nichols is a WWII Veteran and resides at Fairwinds, a retirement community in Redmond.

Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo
                                Nick Nichols and his wife, Phyllis.

Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo Nick Nichols and his wife, Phyllis.

More in Life

Washington State Fair cancelled

COVID-19 outbreak claims another event

TLG Motion Pictures CEO Erik Bernard and TLG founder Courtney LeMarco on a set. Photo courtesy TLG Motion Pictures.
Local production company seeking film, TV pitches from young minority creatives

The Big Pitch competition, put on by TLG Motion Pictures (“Hoarders”), started about six months ago.

Local musicians hold virtual benefit concert for mental health

The stream-a-thon supports NAMI Eastside and nonprofit Hold Your Crown

Exterior of the Redmond Historical Society office. File photo
Redmond Historical Society is documenting COVID-19’s impact on community

Submissions will be included in the organization’s archives.

Is it safe to go to the dentist?

What precautions are dentists taking to protect patients?

Little Bit riding center in Redmond counting on upcoming virtual fundraiser

The 35th annual Reins of Life Gala Auction is going virtual this year, including an online auction, raise the paddle and online event.

Medic One Foundation’s Gratitude Meals offer support to first responders, local businesses

The initiative provides hearty lunches to first responders staffing the COVID-19 testing sites as they work to test their colleagues.

UW students create Spira app to gather COVID-19 data

The app was created to screen for respiratory diseases but the teen creators shifted their focus once the COVID-19 outbreak began.

Redmond Middle School student raises money for low-income families

Om Shah, 13, created a GoFundMe to support the Seattle Foundation’s COVID-19 Response Fund.

‘Don’t assume it can’t happen to you’

Federal Way resident Evelyn Allcorn shares story of her husband’s battle with COVID-19 after he tested positive on March 28.

Savannah Lynn and Will Chadek in the Second Story Repertory of Redmond’s production of “The Fantasticks.” “The Fantasticks” had been performed three times by the organization until coronavirus concerns resulted in the cancellation of the remaining dates. Photo by Michael Brunk
How is the coronavirus affecting the arts?

Representatives from Eastside arts institutions discuss their experiences.

Madison Miller/staff photo
                                Aleana Roberts tries out the Jelly Jolts’ braille menu at Molly Moon’s on Feb. 23. From left: Roberts, Sanj Saini, Varnika Bhargava and Katiali Singh.
LWSD teens reveal braille menu at Molly Moon’s in Redmond

From 3-5 p.m. on Feb. 23, all sales from Molly Moon’s went to the Lighthouse for the Blind.