Traffic in South King County. File photo

Traffic in South King County. File photo

5 things Democrats didn’t say about their $17B transpo plan

  • By Jerry Cornfield jcornfield@soundpublishing.com
  • Wednesday, February 9, 2022 4:00pm
  • News

Democrats’ transportation package in the Washington state Legislature, as of Feb. 9, spends lots of money. It also makes new policy.

Here are five points House and Senate Democrats didn’t make about the content of Move Ahead Washington.

■ It’s pay-as-you-go. Without bonding of a gas tax hike, there’s no locked-in revenue stream for the duration. Federal dollars run out in five years. Cap-and-trade receipts look certain now, but change happens. That $2 billion contribution from the general fund (or reserves?) is seed money and will go quickly.

■ It recycles dollars. Annual transfers of $31 million are required for 13 years starting in 2026. That money will come from sales tax paid on projects funded through the package.

■ It expands use of traffic-enforcement cameras near schools, parks and hospitals, and requires cities to split a portion of fines 50-50 with the state. The language mirrors legislation which died in the House transportation committee.

■ It sets the stage for higher tolls on I-405 and Highway 167 express lanes. It wants the state transportation commission to “reevaluate options at least every two years” to ensure cars average 45 miles an hour at least 90% of the time in peak travel periods. Toll rates are the commission’s purview.

■ It upholds an Inslee veto that the Legislature is challenging in court. When Inslee signed the low carbon fuel standard bill in May, he crossed out paragraphs tying the start of enforcement with passage of a transportation package containing a gas tax increase. In December, the Legislature sued the governor, alleging the veto of a subsection exceeded his authority.

With Move Ahead, Democrats are moving on. They’ve cobbled language from the clean fuel standard law, absent the linkage they wrote last year and are fighting in court to retain.

Pencils down

Washington’s new legislative and congressional district maps are finished.

On Tuesday, the state Senate approved roughly 75 small adjustments to lines drawn by the Redistricting Commission. Since the House did the same last week, the once-a-decade process is completed, barring legal challenges.

While the House acted with near unanimity, the Senate didn’t. Its 35-14 vote just cleared the two-thirds requirement for passage.

Members of both parties had sharp words in the floor debate.

Democrat Sen. Rebecca Saldana of Seattle criticized commissioners for creating a map for legislative districts that may blunt the voice of Latin voters in violation of federal voting rights laws — the central argument of a pending lawsuit.

Republican Sen. Brad Hawkins of East Wenatchee blasted commissioners for carving up his 12th District in ways roundly opposed by residents. His newly drawn district will stretch across the mountains into Snohomish County.

“They produced a final product that didn’t in any way reflect public comment from my district,” he said. “I’m pretty disgusted with what happened.”


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@redmond-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.redmond-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Teaser
King County experts discuss extreme heat mitigation plan

The plan includes improving infrastructure and communications to prevent future disasters.

King County Prosecuting Attorney Dan Satterburg (File Photo)
King County Prosecuting Attorney vows to protect reproductive freedom

Dan Satterberg joins over 80 prosecutors from around the country in their pledge.

Teaser
King County approves emergency grant after U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade

Washington is expecting an influx of people seeking abortions from out of state.

Fedor Osipov, 15, flips into Steel Lake in Federal Way during last year's heatwave on June 28, 2021. Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing
Heatwave expected to hit King County

Temperatures will likely reach 90 degrees Fahrenheit on Sunday, June 26, and Monday, June 27.

Judged by XII: A King County Local Dive podcast. The hands shown here belong to Auburn Police Officer Jeffrey Nelson, who has been charged with homicide in the 2019 death of Jesse Sarey.
JUDGED BY XII: Examining Auburn police officer’s grim tattoos

Episode 5 in special podcast series that explores Jeffrey Nelson’s role in the death of Jesse Sarey.

Derby Days. Courtesy of Experience Redmond.
Mark your calendars for Redmond’s annual Derby Days celebration

Attendees should expect two days of action-packed fun from July 8-9.

File photo.
Former Bellevue teacher sentenced in federal court over child pornography

Department of Justice says the man had 1,764 images of child sexual abuse in his possession.

Photo courtesy of King County.
Officials urge caution when swimming this summer

Cold spring temperatures and larger than normal snowpack have created dangerous conditions

File photo.
Bellevue man charged in 2019 assault that left a man dead on a Redmond roadway

After a two-year investigation, Bradley Hibbard was arrested for murder in the second degree.

Most Read