File photo

File photo

Candidate filing begins May 13

Residents will vote on Redmond council members, mayor and school board directors.

Candidate filing for the November election begins May 13 and individuals seeking a seat in Redmond City Council and Lake Washington School District have the opportunity to register to run for available positions.

Council Positions 1, 3, 5 and 7 — which are held by Hank Myers, Hank Margeson, Angela Birney and David Carson — are up for election.

Myers announced his candidacy for re-election for Pos. 1 earlier this month. According to a release, Myers stated he will help ensure Redmond improves “roads, keep taxes affordable, while protecting the community and environmental values” that are important to Redmond.

Running for Pos. 5 is first-time candidate Vanessa Kritzer. Kritzer is currently a planning commissioner, a board member for the Anti-Defamation League – Pacific Northwest and National Women’s Political Caucus of Washington. According to a release, Kritzer is running for City Council because she wants to “ensure that as Redmond grows it can continue to be a thriving, accessible, and inclusive community.”

Farshad Ansari will also run for council as a first-time candidate. Ansari is running for Pos. 7. Ansari stated he wants to be a voice for Redmond residents from all walks of life. His goal is to include everybody’s voice in every decision Redmond makes.

Redmond locals Varisha Khan and Henry Myers have also filed to campaign for positions on the council.

The mayor position is also up for election this year. Mayor John Marchione announced in January that he will not be running for re-election.

“This is a good time for me, professionally and personally, to pass the baton to the next elected official who will run the city,” Marchione said in a press release. “The city’s successes abound — new and improved parks, roads, trails, housing and community events. In 2023, Sound Transit light rail service will connect our residents and employees to the region. Now it is time for the city to engage the community in conversations to build Redmond’s 2050 vision and Comprehensive Plan to manage growth over the coming decades.”

Andrew Koeppen, a long-time Redmond resident, local real estate agent and business owner will run for mayor as a first-time candidate. Koeppen believes Redmond needs a city government in which ethics is ingrained into its culture, according to a release.

Councilmember Steve Fields announced that he will also run for mayor. Fields stressed in a release that integrity and accountability are expectations he will set for everyone who works in the city government.

Birney is also running for the mayor position. She announced her running in January. If elected mayor, Birney said she wants to increase affordable housing and transportation options.

On the Lake Washington School District board of directors, positions 1, 2, and 5, which are held by Eric Laliberte, Chris, Siri Bliesner are up for election.

Candidates must complete a declaration of candidacy and be registered to vote in the district.

See, www.kingcounty.gov/depts/elections.aspx for more.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@redmond-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.redmond-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

West Point Wastewater Treatment Plant. Photo courtesy of Washington Department of Ecology.
EPA loans King County $96.8 million to prevent untreated water from spilling into Puget Sound

Loan comes a week after an over 10 million gallon overflow into the Puget Sound and Lake Washington.

National Guard troops, pictured Jan. 11 at the state Capitol in Olympia, have been on standby in case of violent protests. (Photo by Roger Harnack, Cheney Free Press)
At the state Capitol, a quiet day amid heightened security

There were no protests or arrests as troopers patrolled and the National Guard assumed a lower profile.

West Point Treatment Plant in Seattle. Photo courtesy of King County
Power outages cause massive wastewater spill into Puget Sound, Lake Washington

King County estimates millions gallons of untreated wastewater overflowed into surrounding waters.

Democrats in the Washington State House are proposing to pay for transportation improvements partly by raising the gas tax by 18 cents. (Sound Publishing file photo)
House Democrats lay out massive $26B transportation package funded by gas tax hike

An 18-cent gas tax increase and a fee on carbon emissions would fund new roads and more.

File photo
Report: 70 percent of gun deaths in Washington are attributable to suicide

Research done at The Firearm Injury and Policy Research Program at Harborview… Continue reading

June 2018 algae bloom. Photo courtesy of Department of Ecology
Human-caused ‘dead zones’ threaten health of Puget Sound

Wastewater treatment plants account for about 70% of the excess nutrients.

Robert Allen, 61, had never been homeless in his life before 2019, when he lost his housing. The chef has been trying to get back on his feet, and hopes to open a nonprofit and make hot sauce. File photo
King County implements 0.01% sales tax to raise money for housing the homeless

Officials plan to buy hotels, motels and nursing homes for conversion into permanent housing.

Teaser
Social media site Parler returns after registering with Sammamish company

The right-wing social media website is not being hosted by Epik, but registered its domain.

Local restaurants have had to adapt to new rules during the COVID pandemic. Pictured: JP’s Tavern in Federal Way’s turkey club sandwich with a side of tater tots. File photo
State lawmakers propose bill to fast-track the governor’s reopening plan

Bill’s sponsors want to give legislature control over COVID-19 restrictions.

Most Read