Overlake students participate in a walkout at the Redmond school on Wednesday morning calling on legislators and Congress to enact “common sense” gun control laws. The nationwide school walkouts were sparked by the Parkland, Florida, school shooting in which 17 students and teachers were killed on Feb. 14, a month from the date of the walkouts. Photo courtesy of Susan Messier/The Overlake School

Overlake students participate in a walkout at the Redmond school on Wednesday morning calling on legislators and Congress to enact “common sense” gun control laws. The nationwide school walkouts were sparked by the Parkland, Florida, school shooting in which 17 students and teachers were killed on Feb. 14, a month from the date of the walkouts. Photo courtesy of Susan Messier/The Overlake School

Change comes to Redmond in 2018

Here are some of the top stories in the last year.

Another year has come and gone for Redmond. It was a busy year with ribbon cuttings, new construction, recognition, inspiration and justice.

Here are some of the biggest stories for 2018:

January

“Mayor John Marchione raises expectations for the city’s future:” Going into the new year, Marchione laid out five main priorities to focus on in 2018. His hope to continue and refine the city’s growth included working to implement Sound Transit 3, improving zoning codes, renovating and expanding the Microsoft campus, planning for capital investments and developing infrastructure.

February

“City Council approves affordable housing funds:” In February, funding for A Regional Coalition on Housing (ARCH) was approved in the amount of $75,890. For its 2018 budget, ARCH spent $1 million to preserve at least 75 affordable units in a variety of housing types. ARCH also helped the city increase affordable housing contracts and monitor rents and resales of affordable units in Redmond.

March

“Overlake students participate in national school walkout:” In March, Overlake students joined the national school walkout to call for gun control. The Redmond students called out legislators and members of Congress to enact “common sense” gun control laws.

April

“Sound Transit construction serves upcoming Redmond light trail stations:” Eastside locals met in April to break ground on a new maintenance facility for Sound Transit. Once completed, the Operations and Maintenance Facility East will serve Redmond stations in the Sound Transit 3 package.

Sound Transit and Bellevue officials broke ground on a new light rail maintenance facility in the city’s Spring District on April 4. It will help facilitate the planned light rail expansions in coming years. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo

Sound Transit and Bellevue officials broke ground on a new light rail maintenance facility in the city’s Spring District on April 4. It will help facilitate the planned light rail expansions in coming years. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo

May

“Eleven-year-old girl raises money for brain cancer:” Megan Lisk sold hand-drawn and painted cards at the Seattle Brain Cancer Walk on May 6. The funds were donated to help find a cure for brain cancer, which took father Dennis Lisk. Family and friends raised more than $3,425.

June

“FBI recognizes Redmond Police detective:” The FBI recognized Redmond police detective Natalie D’Amico for devotion to duty in a sex trafficking case. The Redmond Police Department’s lengthy investigation of more than three years led to David Delay being sentenced to 33 years in prison for 17 federal felonies.

July

“City commits to customer service:” The Redmond City Hall customer service center made progress on its goal to be a “one-stop shop” for residents. The $3 million online program helped improve communication with customers. Hundreds of customer service requests were resolved and more than 5,300 business license was reviewed, approved and issued.

August

“Hopelink opens Redmond facility:” Hopelink cut the ribbon of its new flagship facility in Redmond. The 28,000-square-foot, $14.2 million facility houses the nonprofit’s administrative team and Redmond client services staff and a larger, more efficient food bank.

September

“New Downtown Park opens:” The community gathered for the grand opening of the city’s new Downtown Park event, which included a ribbon cutting, community picnic, a performance by Lucia Neare’s Theatrical Wonders and more.

Above: Overlake students participate in a walkout at the Redmond school, calling on legislators and Congress to enact “common sense” gun control laws. The nationwide school walkouts were sparked by the Parkland, Florida, school shooting in which 17 students and teachers were killed on Feb. 14, a month from the date of the walkouts. Photo courtesy of Susan Messier/The Overlake School
                                Right: A few of Lucia Neare’s mice pull a park goer into their circle of merriment. See page 3 for full list of top 2018 stories. Samantha Pak/staff photo

Above: Overlake students participate in a walkout at the Redmond school, calling on legislators and Congress to enact “common sense” gun control laws. The nationwide school walkouts were sparked by the Parkland, Florida, school shooting in which 17 students and teachers were killed on Feb. 14, a month from the date of the walkouts. Photo courtesy of Susan Messier/The Overlake School Right: A few of Lucia Neare’s mice pull a park goer into their circle of merriment. See page 3 for full list of top 2018 stories. Samantha Pak/staff photo

October

“Local teens organize eighth annual TEDxYouth event:” Redmond teens planned and organized the TEDxYouth event that touched on the theme, “Escaping the Echo Chamber.” The event featured nine young speakers who motivated the youth.

November

“Facebook plans major research development:” Facebook’s plan to construct a large research facility called Building X will be located off Willows Road in Redmond. The five-story building will hold house research labs, meeting spaces and kitchens.

December

“Redmond woman tied to sham charity scheme:” Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson filed a lawsuit accusing the Haueter family of running “sham” charities and pocketing most of the donations. The family operation included Redmond resident Tracee Richardson, her parents, siblings, and their spouses. The defendants gained more than $1 million through deceitful practices.

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