City Council adopts cultural inclusion resolution

  • Thursday, January 19, 2017 2:18pm
  • News
City Council adopts cultural inclusion resolution

At Tuesday night’s meeting, the day after Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Redmond City Council passed a resolution affirming the city’s ongoing effort of being a culturally inclusive community. The resolution was brought forth by the mayor and City Council with recommendation from the Arts and Culture Commission.

The resolution affirms the city’s commitment to welcoming and engaging with all community members and visitors regardless of their age, race, ethnicity, country of origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, ability, religion, income, political persuasion or cultural practices.

The city is also committed to the principles of inclusiveness and incorporating diversity into every part of its operations. This includes future policy and programming decisions citywide as city officials and city staff are urged to be mindful of inclusion in the work that they do, so as to continue improving Redmond’s culture of inclusion.

“Redmond continues to grow and become increasingly diverse in so many areas. It’s what makes our community richer and stronger. We want to ensure that everyone in Redmond feels welcome and part of this community, no matter their heritage, ethnic background, religion or any other factor,” said City Council member Hank Margeson.

Margeson read the resolution aloud at the meeting. Numerous Redmond cultural and faith-based organizations were represented in the audience, showing support of the resolution.




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