Kailan Manandic/staff photo                                 Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.

Kailan Manandic/staff photo Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.

Eastside’s first permanent shelter breaks ground

The shelter will serve single women and families with children who are experiencing homelessness.

Shovels struck the earth in celebration of an Eastside-wide partnership that brought residents, nonprofits, cities and King County together in an effort to assist families and women in need.

The Eastside’s first and only permanent shelter for women and families broke ground in Kirkland on the evening of April 10 and will eventually serve locals experiencing homelessness. The two-story, 19,000 square feet facility will provide 100 beds, housing and supportive case management, shower and laundry facilities, medical services and a general safe space 24 hours a day, seven days a week throughout the year.

“I am so thrilled to be here with all of you for this incredible occasion,” Kirkland Mayor Penny Sweet said. “This project is the result of unprecedented collaboration by nonprofits, faith communities, city, county and state governments, and the community.”

Kirkland Mayor Penny Sweet gives her remarks at the groundbreaking celebration for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. The shelter is funded by community support, King County, Kirkland and Washington state. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

Kirkland Mayor Penny Sweet gives her remarks at the groundbreaking celebration for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. The shelter is funded by community support, King County, Kirkland and Washington state. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

The shelter was first conceived in 2016 when the city of Kirkland began discussing a permanent facility to serve adult women and children experiencing homelessness.

The partnership includes the New Bethlehem Project, which includes Holy Family Catholic Church in Kirkland, St. Louise Catholic Church in Bellevue, Catholic Community Services (CCS) and Salt House Lutheran Church.

The project has seen wide-spread support, securing more than $9 million in funding from various communities, nonprofits and government entities.

The city of Kirkland will contribute $1.15 million; King County will contribute a total of $5.2 million, $2.5 million of which will come through its veterans, seniors and human services levy and through a community development block grant; the state will contribute $2.35 million; A Regional Coalition for Housing (ARCH) will contribute $504,406; and private donations from the Eastside community, particularly Holy Family Church, St. Louise Church and donors from The Sophia Way will contribute $2.1 million and continue to fund shelter operations.

“The 24-hour services are really critical to helping people get back momentum in their lives…Today, we are breaking ground for a new permanent location, which is cause for a real celebration,” said King County Executive Dow Constantine at the event. “King County is proud to be a partner in the regional shelter effort…We are able to invest $2.7 million to help build the shelter and the levy will also provide an additional $2.5 million in operating and services funding because we know a warm safe bed is an extremely important thing for people but so too is access to onsite supportive services.”

King County Executive Dow Constantine gives his remarks at the groundbreaking celebration for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. The shelter is funded by community support, King County, Kirkland and Washington state. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

King County Executive Dow Constantine gives his remarks at the groundbreaking celebration for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. The shelter is funded by community support, King County, Kirkland and Washington state. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

Salt House Church has offered up space to host the facility and in a groundbreaking celebration, various church officials, community members and local government leaders and workers gathered at the church. Everyone involved had an opportunity to help dig up the first patch of dirt as onlookers cheered.

The land was secured in a 2017 Memorandum of Understanding between Holy Spirit Lutheran Church, Salt House Church and the city of Kirkland. The city purchased the property and leased it out to CCS. Salt House will also help support the neighboring shelter and the women and children it will serve.

Kailan Manandic/staff photo                                 Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.

Kailan Manandic/staff photo Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.

Workers hope to finish construction in 2020.

“So this is how we will be successful in creating the emergency and the long-term housing and services we need to give every person in our communities the opportunity to reclaim their health, their security [and] their dignity,” Constantine said. “So I look forward to coming back with you, madam mayor, and cutting the ribbon this fantastic new opportunity for our community.”

The Sophia Way and CCS’s New Bethlehem Project will occupy the new facility, offering their various services to any woman or family who need the help. The Sophia Way will serve single adult women on the facility’s second floor while the New Bethlehem Project will serve families with children on the first floor.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@redmond-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.redmond-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

Kailan Manandic/staff photo                                 Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.

Kailan Manandic/staff photo Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.

Community members join local government leaders, church officials and workers at the Salt House Church in Kirkland to celebrate the shelter groundbreaking. Locals were able to see designs for the shelter and ask questions of staff. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

Community members join local government leaders, church officials and workers at the Salt House Church in Kirkland to celebrate the shelter groundbreaking. Locals were able to see designs for the shelter and ask questions of staff. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

More in News

File photo
Snow Lake, located near Snoqualmie Pass in Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest.
Washington releases new forest plan

It outlines ways the state will protect and maintain forest health.

Sage Viniconis is a career performing artist in King County who’s been out of work and seeking creative outlets during the COVID-19 pandemic. Courtesy photo/Sage Viniconis
Puget Sound artists adapt creativity, and business sense, to pandemic

Artists Sunday is an online directory that connects artists across the county, state and nation.

Chris Fagan trekking across Antarctica in 2014. Contributed by Chris Fagan
South Pole or Bust

The story of a North Bend couple who trekked across Antarctica.

King County Council has nine members who each represent a district. Courtesy of kingcounty.gov
King County Council passes $12.59 billion biennial budget

King County Council on Nov. 17 passed a $12.59 billion biennial budget… Continue reading

pexels
EvergreenHealth receives stroke care certification

The hospital system was able to demonstrate quality care and an advanced stroke program

State Sen. Mark Mullet (D-Issaquah) authored the letter to Gov. Jay Inslee. Mullet represents the 5th Legislative District. File photo
Democratic lawmakers ask Inslee to lift ban on indoor dining

They want to try to scaling back on occupancy before forcing an end to inside service.

Tim Eyman get in some last minute campaigning for I-976 in downtown Bellevue on the afternoon of Nov. 5, 2019. File photo
Eyman fights allegation he repeatedly broke campaign laws

In a lawsuit, the state accuses the prolific initiative promoter of getting kickbacks.

Kabal Gill, owner of East India Grill in Federal Way, wears gloves to hand over take-out orders at his restaurant. File photo
State halts indoor service at bars, restaurants, home guests

Amid soaring new coronavirus cases and an overburdened health care system, the state’s clamping down.

King County 2020 unemployment numbers. Source: Washington State Employment Security Department
Boeing, coronavirus likely to impact King County economy

Unemployment remained high in September.

A rendering of the entrance of the upcoming southeast Redmond Light Rail stop. Courtesy Photo/Sound Transit
Construction work increasing around Redmond light rail extension

Residents can expect upcoming tree removal, structure demolition, utility relocation along State Route 520

File photo
State Supreme Court strikes down $30 car-tab initiative

Justices unanimously agreed that voter-approved Initiative 976 is unconstitutional.

The closed Redmond Senior Center on Oct. 13. Community members leave ribbons in the heart to honor the memories of the to-be-demolished center. Haley Ausbun/staff photo.
Demolition of Redmond Senior Center underway this month

The city council has an upcoming vote on the size and cost of the future senior center