Doreen Marchione at her retirement celebration in 2017. File photo

Doreen Marchione at her retirement celebration in 2017. File photo

Former Redmond mayor Doreen Marchione dies at 80

Marchione served on Redmond City Council as well as Kirkland City Council.

Former Redmond Mayor Doreen Marchione has died at the age of 80. According to the city of Redmond, she “passed away peacefully,” on July 27, surrounded by family.

Marchione was first elected to Redmond City Council in 1975 and served as mayor from 1984-91.

“Doreen’s commitment to a lifetime of public service always impressed me,” former Redmond city councilmember Arnie Tomac said in a city of Redmond press release. “She served on both the Redmond and Kirkland City Council and was the mayor of Redmond. She was always striving to make Redmond and Kirkland better and a great place to call home. Her support of her family, friends and community was legendary.”

Marchione served as a Kirkland City Council member for eight years, including two years as deputy mayor.

“The city of Kirkland was incredibly fortunate to be the beneficiary of Doreen Marchione’s leadership during her eight years on the City Council,” Kirkland Mayor Penny Sweet said. “Doreen brought a culture to the council that was focused on collaboration, accountability, and collegiality. Her particular legacy to the city is our comprehensive ethics policy and our new Human Service Commission. Her impact on our City Council continues to have a tremendous influence today. Her dedication to public service, to advocating for those in need, and to mentoring future leaders, particularly women, is inspiring. Our community was blessed to benefit from her leadership.”

According to a city of Redmond press release, Marchione was born and raised in Seattle. She graduated from St. Edwards, Holy Names Academy and Seattle University. For more than 30 years, Marchione was dedicated to public service. During her 15 years as CEO of Hopelink — the largest provider of social services in north and east King County — she oversaw a 150 percent increase in the number of residents Hopelink assisted.

In the city release, Hopelink CEO Lauren Thomas said Marchione was instrumental in developing Hopelink’s Avondale Park housing facility. It bears her name today, leaving a legacy that “holds local families in her arms,” Thomas said.

“She was so much more than a great leader. Doreen was a mentor, and a fierce advocate for those in need; a caring, passionate woman who wore her heart on her sleeve and lived her commitment to our community every single day,” Thomas said in the release. “She will be deeply missed, and her passion will be carried forward through the lives of her family, friends, and Hopelink family.”

Marchione also served on multiple regional boards and committees, including 15 years on the Seattle University College of Arts and Sciences Leadership Council, State Transportation Improvement Board, Commissioner of King County Housing Authority, president of the Washington State Association of Community Agencies, and board member of the Kirkland Performance Center.

“Doreen was a true force of nature in our region,” said Joan McBride, former Washington state representative for the 48th Legislative District, in the release. “Befriending and mentoring countless women on the Eastside, Doreen set the example of collegiality and dignity that exemplifies the best in an elected official. May her legacy of commitment to the community, zeal for justice, and dedication to the precepts of good government live on.”

Marchione is mother to current Redmond Mayor John Marchione.

A funeral mass will be held at 11 a.m. on Aug. 2 at Holy Family Catholic Church in Kirkland. Friends are invited to view photos and share memories in the family’s online guest book at www.flintofts.com.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in Doreen’s name to Hopelink or the Kirkland Performance Center.

Doreen Marchione is survived by her four sons, John, Paul (Grainne), Michael (Christina) and David, and four grandchildren, Andrew, Maria, Sofia and Daniel. She is also survived by her significant other, Robert Caldwell and her brother, John Foster.


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