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King County leaders propose funding to support immigrants in the region

$11.3 million proposed for citizenship application support and COVID relief to undocumented families

The King County Council on Tuesday approved a first-in-the-nation program to help immigrants apply for documented status and citizenship, sponsored by Council Chair Claudia Balducci, and began deliberations on an $11.3 million general relief fund to support undocumented King County residents, proposed by King County Executive Dow Constantine.

The combined investment of more than $16 million will help King County immigrants overcome barriers to legal status and assist those who have not been able to access federal benefits associated with COVID-19 relief.

“Our community was the first in the nation to be hit by an outbreak of COVID-19 and King County has done much to support thousands of families with relief funds. However, many of our immigrant residents have been categorically excluded from receiving emergency relief,” Balducci said.

The program includes two components Fee Support and a Relief Program.

The supplemental budget approved by Council Tuesday includes $5 million in to help immigrants apply for legal status, including filing fees with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and Executive Office for Immigration Review.

Immigration application costs vary from a couple hundred dollars to thousands of dollars per applicant. When multiple family members apply for relief together, the cost burden can be insurmountable for low-income families.

As part of the county’s eighth COVID budget, Executive Constantine proposes $11.3 million for grants to immigrants to meet basic expenses.

According to the King County press release, immigrants have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic, but many have not been able to access federal relief funds due to their legal status. This program uses county General Fund dollars to start to redress that inequity.

“This region and nation owe a debt of gratitude to all essential workers who put their lives on the line during the pandemic. The fact that so many are undocumented immigrants underscores our responsibility to help those now seeking legal status,” said Constantine.

Applicants must be living, working, going to school or currently detained in ICE facilities but previously living, working or going to school in King County in order to qualify.


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