Komen Puget Sound and Comcast announce Race for the Cure registration and donation matches at XFINITY stores

Susan G. Komen Puget Sound officials announced last week at a ceremony hosted at the Redmond XFINITY store a partnership through which Comcast is matching Race for the Cure registration fees and donations up to $35 for those who sign up in person at participating XFINITY retail stores in Washington state.

  • Tuesday, April 28, 2015 6:02pm
  • News

People can double the donation for the Susan G. Komen Puget Sound Race for the Cure if they sign up for the race at an XFINITY Store. Making this announcement last week at the Redmond XFINITY store were

Susan G. Komen Puget Sound officials announced last week at a ceremony hosted at the Redmond XFINITY store a partnership through which Comcast is matching Race for the Cure registration fees and donations up to $35 for those who sign up in person at participating XFINITY retail stores in Washington state.

To double their donations, participants can head to their nearest XFINITY retail store and look for the pink iPad display. Race registrations will be accepted and matched at XFINITY stores through June 5 and donations through race day, June 7.

Comcast has committed to support the matching campaign up to $25,000. The company will match one registration fee or donation per participant.

Race for the Cure starts at 8 a.m. on June 7 at Seattle Center. This year’s 22nd annual race includes events for walkers, runners, families and breast-cancer survivors.

“When people come to XFINITY stores to register or donate to Race for the Cure, the result will be significant dollars toward our fight against breast cancer. That means help for underserved women and men in our community…along with funding to advance critical breast-cancer research, some of which is taking place locally at the University of Washington and Fred Hutch. We’re joining forces — all to get rid of this horrible disease,” David Richart, executive director of Komen Puget Sound, told the Redmond audience.

Race for the Cure is Komen Puget Sound’s single largest fundraiser; donations are invested in breast-cancer research and local grants that provide breast-cancer early detection screenings and education, patient navigation and support to those in need.

“Employees throughout Comcast participated in the Race for the Cure for years, and it’s exciting to take this support to a new level. I can’t think of anyone at Comcast who hasn’t been touched in some way by breast cancer through personal experience or family and friends. We are excited to partner with the Susan G. Komen Puget Sound and be a part of the solution to end breast cancer,” said Steve Kipp, vice president of external affairs for Comcast.

Washington state has the fifth highest breast-cancer incidence rate in the U.S., according to a 2015 American Cancer Society survey. Breast cancer affects women and men across regions, ethnicities and ages. In 2015, there are expected to be nearly 295,000 new breast-cancer cases and more than 40,000 deaths in the United States.

The hashtag for the campaign is #ComcastGoesPink. For information about the campaign, visit: www.KomenPugetSound.org/ComcastMatch. For more information, contact Komen Puget Sound at (206) 633-0303 or email: race@pskomen.org.

Below is a list of participating stores. A person can quickly find the closest store through http://customer.comcast.com/service-center-locations. Comcast service centers, call centers and administrative offices are not Race for the Cure sign-up matching sites.

 

 

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