LWSD seeks feedback on Redmond area school-boundary changes

In January 2017, a Lake Washington School District boundary committee began the work to recommend new school attendance boundaries in the Redmond area.

The district is building two new elementary schools and one new middle school in the Redmond area due to enrollment growth. These new schools serve students drawn from existing schools. Neighborhood boundaries for all elementary and middle schools in Redmond could change as a result.

The boundary committee is preparing multiple new attendance boundary options. The boundary committee will hold two meetings to get feedback on those options. Attendees will view the options in an open house format. Committee members will be present to discuss these scenarios and answer questions. Both meetings will present the same information.

May 4, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Redmond Middle School Cafeteria

May 9, 6:30-8:00 p.m., Evergreen Middle School Cafeteria

Parents and community members are invited to come to either meeting to learn more and review the options. Attendees will be able to provide written feedback at the meeting. Those who cannot attend will be able to review the proposed scenarios on the district website and submit feedback online.

The committee will review the community feedback from these meetings. Possible options will be refined and narrowed down based on that feedback. Subsequent community meetings will enable parents and community members to provide more input before the committee makes any recommendations.




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