Microsoft president receives outstanding cross border leadership award

Brad Smith has been a key leader in the Cascadia Innovation Corridor efforts.

  • Thursday, August 2, 2018 8:30am
  • News

President of Microsoft, Brad Smith, recently received the outstanding cross border leadership award.

“During these trying times in US-Canada relations, Brad has been a shining beacon of inspiration and hope on both sides of the border,” Senator Arnie Roblan (OR), PNWER President, said on stage in front of 350 US-Canada legislators and business leaders during the Pacific NorthWest Economic Region’s (PNWER) 2018 Annual Summit in Spokane, WA.

Every year, one private sector individual from business or industry is selected to receive PNWER’s Alan Bluechel Award. Named after PNWER’s founder, the award recognizes exceptional leadership in building cross-border relations and trust.

Smith spoke at the 2017 PNWER Summit about Canadian and United States interests and the Cascadia Innovation Corridor and university partnerships. This award is presented to individuals who go above and beyond their own corporate interests in building relationships across the US-Canada border.

In this past year, Smith was a key leader in the Cascadia Innovation Corridor efforts. He was instrumental in re-establishing the harbor-to-harbour air service between Vancouver’s Coal Harbor and Seattle’s Lake Union.

Nicknamed the “Nerd Bird,” this air service allows people to easily travel between Seattle and Vancouver in about an hour, maximizing their productivity. As President of Microsoft, Smith has partnered with governments and stakeholders to study the potential benefits that high speed rail could bring to the Pacific Northwest. Microsoft leads the way as the only private sector organization to contribute to the High Speed Rail feasibility analysis.

Smith also called to plan for the 100th Anniversary of the Peace Arch in 2021 and his leadership is contributing to the strong ties between the two nations.

The award was accepted by Irene Plenefisch, Director, Government Affairs for Microsoft, at our plenary session on July 24.

More in News

Gov. Jay Inslee shakes hands with Dinah Griffey after signing Senate Bill 5649 on April 19. The law revises the statute of limitations for sex crimes. Photo by Emma Epperly, WNPA Olympia News Bureau
Hits and misses from Legislature’s 2019 session

New laws target vaccines, sex crimes and daylight savings; losers include sex ed and dwarf tossing bills.

Gov. Jay Inslee speaks to protesting nurses on April 24 at the State Capitol Building in Olympia. Inslee indicated he would sign the bill for meal and rest breaks into law if it passes both chambers. Photo by Emma Epperly, WNPA Olympia News Bureau
Lawmakers approve ‘nursing bill’ for mandatory meal and rest breaks

Nurses show up in Olympia to support bill, protest Sen. Walsh’s remarks.

Scott Barden stands next to the pit that will house the newest, and possibly final, section of the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill near Maple Valley. The pit is 120 feet deep, and around another 180 feet will be built on top of it over the next decade. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
King County’s landfill is going to get bigger

A ninth cell will be built, extending its life by another decade.

An aircraft is pictured at King County International Airport, also known as Boeing Field. Photo courtesy of kingcounty.gov
King County wants to end deportation flights for ICE

Legal challenge expected from federal government.

April 2019 special election preliminary results

LWSD levy passing; Fall City fire merger and hospital bond coming up short.

King County Council gives the go-ahead for parks levy

Voters will be asked to decide whether to approve the levy on Aug. 6.

Toddler window falls are preventable

A demonstration provided parents with ways to protect children.

Most Read