Redmond City Council approves land-use proposals

The Redmond City Council held public hearings on two land-use projects on Nov. 7.

The first was on a proposal concerning the Group Health Overlake Village plan that was approved in 2011.

The project will include a minimum of 1,400 residential units, a 2.7 acre public park, off-site tree mitigation and at least 25,000 square feet of office and retail space along 152nd Avenue Northeast. It will also include a hotel and conference center.

The developers requested two amendments in 2015.

One of the requested changes is to allow residential development in commercially designated lots.

This would mean there would be the potential for multifamily housing to be created and increase the number of affordable units. The city currently requires developers to set aside 10 percent of all new units to be classified as affordable housing.

According to the city’s comprehensive plan, there is projected to be around 10,550 residents in the Overlake urban center by 2030 with roughly 5,700 housing units.

There were estimated to be around 2,300 of these units in the area around the proposed development, and there are currently 1,756 that have been built or are under construction.

If this project expansion, as well as other projects in the area, are completed, it could bring the potential housing-unit count up to 3,030.

The developers also requested an increase in height restrictions.

The project area is zoned for a maximum building height of six stories. Imagine Housing is requesting they build up to eight stories.

City staff in a report said this six-story restriction was likely implemented to retain a “more human level along busy pedestrian streets.”

However, since neighboring blocks have already been built out, and contain multiple seven-story buildings, including a hotel and a multifamily building, staff said allowing an eight-story development would likely not interfere with the neighborhood character.

If buildings are set back at least 50 feet, they can extend to up to 12 stories under city code.

Three plots of city-owned land were also considered for being put on the market as surplus.

These include a 33,444-square-foot former water reservoir tank in the 9600 block of 175th Place Northeast in Education Hill. This site is zoned for single-family development.

The reservoir was abandoned in the 1960s when the Education Hill water tank was constructed.

A roughly 21,900-square-foot property along Lake Sammamish in the Idylwood neighborhood was also considered.

It was bought in 2013 so the city could construct a manhole to access the sewer line underneath. It is also zoned for single-family use.

Finally, another former reservoir that is located on Northeast 28th Street and 172nd Avenue Northeast will be surplused. It is a roughly 15,700-square-foot reservoir and is zoned for residential use.

City staff said they anticipated the properties could be sold by the end of the year.

Both proposals were approved by the city council.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@redmond-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.redmond-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Investigators release update on Redmond officer shooting

More details of the shooting involving multiple officers and a 39-year-old woman has not yet been released

Washington State Capitol Building in Olympia. File photo
Surge in consumer spending eases state budget challenges

A jump in tax collections cuts a projected $9 billion shortfall in half, acccording to new forecast.

High speed rail and hub cities explored in Cascadia Corridor study

A new paper outlines a potential plan for the region.

Woman shot, killed by officers in Redmond

The woman had called 911 and reported that someone was trying to kill her. Police state she confronted officers with a handgun.

Should state cover school bus costs if there are no riders?

With funding tied to getting students to school, districts are uncertain how much money they’ll receive.

A plane drops fire retardant on the Palmer Mountain Fire last week. The fire is listed as 84 percent contained, and fully lined. Laura Knowlton/Sound Publishing staff photo
Threat multiplier: How climate change, coronavirus and weather are scorching WA

Dry summer conspired with the pandemic and a wind storm.

Screenshot from the state Employment Security Department’s website at esd.wa.gov.
Workers may qualify for an extra $1,500 in unemployment back pay

A federal program will give some of the state’s unemployed a $300 weekly bump for the past five weeks.

King County moves to Stage 2 burn ban

Outdoor fires, even barbecues or in fire pits, are now prohibited.

Image courtesy of the Washington Department of Natural Resources.
Massive wildfires incinerate WA

All state Department of Natural Resources lands were closed to recreational activities on Sept. 8.

Screenshot of the air quality monitor at 11 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 8. Courtesy Puget Sound Clean Air Agency.
King County faces unhealthy air quality due to wildfire smoke

Weather monitors recommend people limit time outdoors, especially children, seniors and those with heart or lung disease.

Amazon adds more office space to Bellevue, now as many new jobs as HQ2

The office space for an additional 10,000 jobs, making it 25,000 coming to downtown, is expected to complete in 2023.