Angela Birney is a Redmond City councilmember running for mayor. Courtesy photo

Angela Birney is a Redmond City councilmember running for mayor. Courtesy photo

Redmond council president Angela Birney to run for mayor

Birney is a 20-year Redmond resident and has served on council since 2016.

  • Friday, January 11, 2019 11:30am
  • News

City Council President Angela Birney announced that she is seeking to run for mayor.

Birney is a 20-year Redmond resident and has served on council since 2016. She is a long-time school and community volunteer and a former middle school science teacher.

“I’m excited for the early support from colleagues,” said Birney in a press release announcing her running for mayor. “But this campaign is about the people of Redmond, who I am proud to serve. I look forward to hearing your ideas, and earning your vote for mayor.”

According to the release, Birney believes in connecting neighborhoods and communities, investing in parks and environmental protections and making Redmond a more inclusive and welcoming community.

Birney said in the release that anyone who works in Redmond should be able to live in Redmond.

If elected mayor, Birney wants to increase affordable housing and transportation options, according to the release. She is also committed to addressing regional challenges such as homelessness, opioid addiction and protection for vulnerable populations, the release states.

Prior to serving on city council, Birney served as the chair of Redmond’s parks and trails commission. She currently represents the city on the Cascade Water Alliance, King County Board of Health, Regional Policy Committee, Sound Cities Association Public Issues Committee and the Community Facilities District, according to the release.

Birney is a Washingtonian native and grew up in Eastern Washington. She received a master’s degree in education from Heritage University and a bachelor’s degree in biology education from Eastern Washington University, according to the release.

Birney lives on Education Hill with her husband and daughters.

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