Redmond to use one hundred percent renewable energy

The city is partnering with Puget Sound Energy’s Green Direct program.

In partnership with Puget Sound Energy (PSE), the city of Redmond is purchasing 100 percent of its electricity for government operations from dedicated, local and renewable energy resources.

PSE’s renewable energy, Green Direct, consists of a combination of wind and solar. The utility’s product is for governments and commercial entities.

Redmond joined the King County-Cities Climate Collaboration in 2014 as part of a pledge to leverage efforts to reduce the local and global impact of climate change. Redmond is now joining Green Direct in its second phase. The first phase included a new wind project in Western Washington that was fully subscribed in 2017. Phase two will include a new solar project in south-central Washington and is expected to be complete in 2021.

“The city of Redmond is proud to be included in the second phase of PSE’s Green Direct program,” stated Redmond Mayor John Marchione in a release. “Moving the city’s operational electricity accounts on to the Green Direct program lowers our electricity costs, aligns with our commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and allows us to take a leadership role in moving the dial towards a more sustainable future for Redmond.”

By subscribing to Green Effect, the city of Redmond is taking one more step in reducing its carbon footprint and meeting the goals of its Climate Action Plan. The city’s Comprehensive Plan and Climate Action Plan make it clear that the city of Redmond is committed to addressing climate change locally, regionally and nationally by acting to lessen greenhouse gas emissions.

“The City of Redmond is committed to a Sustainable future for our citizens and businesses,” reads the pledge. “The City will commit to: engage and coordinate in a regional collaborative approach to anticipate and respond to climate change impacts; move forward working on the strategies identified in this document, which provides both background and direction; strive to reduce the City’s operational carbon footprint as well as the community’s carbon footprint; lead by example and work with residents and businesses to improve reduction of energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions without intruding on property rights; and work towards addressing climate change impacts at the local and regional level complementary to state and national strategies.”

Programs like Green Power, Solar Choice and Customer Connected Solar, are PSE’s strategy to reduce its carbon footprint 50 percent by 2040 while helping its customers do their part in creating a better energy future.

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