Thatcher looks to ‘bring greater accountability to state government’ | 45th District, Pos. 2

Political newcomer and Union Hill area Republican Jim Thatcher is running for 45th District state representative, Position 2 "to help bring a fresh team to our citizen legislature and greater accountability to state government."

Jim Thatcher

Political newcomer and Union Hill area Republican Jim Thatcher is running for 45th District state representative, Position 2 “to help bring a fresh team to our citizen legislature and greater accountability to state government.”

Pos. 2 in the 45th District is currently held by incumbent Rep. Larry Springer, D-Kirkland.

“Our legislators have been gridlocked into four special sessions over the last two years and their budget proposals have been more on gimmicks and wishful thinking than real reforms and long-term sustainability,” Thatcher said in the press release. “As taxpayers we should demand better.”

Thatcher said he will bring his business acumen and proven leadership to the state representative position. He is currently a principal program manager at Microsoft and has worked in the computer industry as an attorney and software developer for more than 20 years.

In that role, he said he has spent a lot of time working with anti-trust regulators and industry-setting standard organizations to develop software standards worldwide.

“Working for Microsoft, we’re not always the most favored people working there,” he laughed during an interview with the Reporter, however, “I’ve worked to come to a consensus on issues around the world. I’ve helped to find solutions that work not only for my own employer, but for the industry as a whole.”

He added looking at problems from all angles is a skill he would bring to Olympia.

Thatcher’s priorities include:

• Real spending controls and budget reforms that meet our priorities without raising taxes.“We’ve been spending money like we have as much coming in as we predicted years ago,” said Thatcher. “This legislature has been slow to recognize that revenue is tapering off. I’d like to bring some commonsense to that budgeting process.”

• Putting education first, rewarding quality teachers, encouraging parental involvement and providing accountable, innovative options to meet student needs.As a father of seven children who have gone through the Lake Washington School District, Thatcher has experienced the public education system firsthand.“We aren’t doing enough for our children in education,” he said. “We have reduced spending, but the state constitution says education is our paramount duty and if we’re not satisfying that, what are we spending our time and money on?”He also noted that not all students want to go to college and the state “needs to do a better job of diversifying our education system so every child has the opportunity to do what they are interested in doing.”

• Encouraging jobs and business development by reducing and simplifying regulations, keeping workers compensation and unemployment insurance affordable and encouraging private sector investment.

He said Washington has world-class companies and “we should expect our state leaders to be world-class as well, leaders who will be open and honest as they work together to solve tough problems.”

He added state representatives should not “saddle our kids with huge debts and unsolved messes.”

Thatcher said in general, he’s been “fairly comfortable” with Rep. Springer’s representation in the legislature. However, he is concerned about Springer’s Democrat leadership.

“I want to make sure that the 45th District is represented – not a political party.”

Thatcher and his wife, Sarah, live in the Union Hill area. He has been active in his church and in community activities, including the Cub Scouts program and the local soccer association.

For more information, visit www.electjimthatcher.com.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@redmond-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.redmond-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

State Capitol Building in Olympia. File photo
Politicians get pay raises, state workers get furloughs

A citizens panel approved the hikes in 2019. Unable to rescind them, lawmakers look to donate their extra earnings.

Starting July 6, three road paving projects to prepare for

Two full road closures and night paving work is coming to Redmond Ridge at Novelty Hill Road, near Duvall, July 6 through August

Human remains in West Seattle identified

Bags of body parts were found in a suitcase along a West Seattle beach on June 19.

According to King County’s Mental Illness and Drug Dependency (MIDD) annual report, Seattle had the highest rate of people using services at 36 percent of the total, followed by 31 percent from South King County, 18 percent from the greater Eastside, and 7 percent from north county including Shoreline. Courtesy image
Drug courts, officer de-escalation programs impacted by MIDD cuts

The fund provides money for mental illness and drug dependency programs across King County.

Summer vehicle travel projected to decrease this year

Traffic this summer will likely be lighter across Washington state than previous… Continue reading

Governor Jay Inslee smiles and laughs Sept. 3, 2019, during a speech at the Lynnwood Link Extension groundbreaking in Lynnwood. A Thurston County judge ruled he exceeded his authority when he vetoed single sentences in the state transportation budget in 2019. (Olivia Vanni / Herald file)
Judge invalidates Gov. Inslee’s veto in roads budget

Lawmakers said the governor crossed a constitutional line.

King County cases among younger adults drives increase in COVID-19 numbers

Over half of all new cases are among people ages 20-39

Kirkland man found guilty of promoting prostitution in Eastside sex trafficking ring

Authorities say suspect ran “successful enterprise” for greater half of a decade.

Public and private universities, colleges, technical schools, apprenticeship programs and similar schools and programs may resume general instruction, including in-person classes and lectures, starting Aug. 1. Pictured: The University of Washington-Bothell campus. File photo
Universities and colleges may reopen in fall, governor says

His order requires masks and physical distancing, among other measures, to help prevent infections.

Most Read