A new beginning at the Redmond Reporter | Editor’s Notebook

As I strolled through the halls at Redmond Elementary on Wednesday, taking back-to-school photos of students and parents, I, too, got caught up in the moment of transitioning from one grade or level to another.

As I strolled through the halls at Redmond Elementary on Wednesday, taking back-to-school photos of students and parents, I, too, got caught up in the moment of transitioning from one grade or level to another.

There were smiles when friends came into view, and maybe even a bit of trepidation about the unknown classroom lessons or situations that will sit around each corner from Day 1 until classes end nine months from now.

This is my first issue as the new editor of the Redmond Reporter. I’m all set to tackle what’s in front of me.

Although I’ve worked in the journalism business for 22 years, I know I don’t have everything figured out — and probably never will. Life just doesn’t work that way. We’re always learning and making the most of each day we’re on the job and going about our daily routines at and away from the office.

I come your way from the Bothell-Kenmore Reporter, where I was editor for five and a half years. Before that, I reported on sports and business news for the Reporter and its predecessor, the Northshore Citizen, after moving here from northern California, where I worked for seven years at the Los Altos Town Crier, near Palo Alto.

Some of you may remember me when I wrote for the Redmond Reporter in its infancy in the early 2000s. Yes, I’ve been here before and got to know a wealth of people in the business and sports realms. I was also writing for the Bellevue and Bothell-Kenmore reporters at the time, so I was all over the place — performing a juggling act of sorts — but I always cherished my time on the Redmond scene.

It’s good to be back on familiar terrain, and I look forward to covering city stories along with seasoned reporter Samantha Pak. It will be tough to fill departed editor Bill Christianson’s shoes, but I’ll give it a shot. After all, more than two decades in the business has got to amount to something, right?

Getting used to new deadlines is always interesting. Just to make sure I wouldn’t be stuck behind the eight ball, I worked some extra evening hours so that I’d be in good shape come deadline day — Thursday.

As I type this column, I’m already way ahead of the game with page layout, Pak is rolling through corrections and we’re set on unleashing another top-notch issue for you to peruse.

I always appreciate the readers who take the time out of their day to follow our reportage, in print and on the Web.

I was thrilled to bring the news to people 22 years ago, and I’m still excited every time someone calls to talk about a story or stops me on the street to discuss the topic of the day.

If you’re ever up for a chat, give me a call at (425) 867-0353, ext. 5050 or drop me a line at anystrom@redmond-reporter.com.

I’ll see you around town.


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