It’s been real, it’s been good, Redmond | Reporter’s Notebook

Samantha Pak

When I first started at the Redmond Reporter, I admit, I didn’t know much about the city — or even the Eastside, for that matter.

While I’d grown up in the Pacific Northwest, I was a north-end girl, mostly sticking to the suburbs that are Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and Edmonds and occasionally venturing down to Seattle for a bit of city life.

By the time I was hired at this publication, I could probably count the times I’d been to Redmond on one hand (with maybe an extra finger or two on the other hand).

This all changed when I was hired to be the reporter at the Reporter and received a crash course in everything Redmond. In the six and a half years that I’ve been with the paper, I’ve learned that Redmond is more than just Microsoft Corp. (although, you’ve got to admit, the tech giant plays a pretty big role around here).

Since I’ve been with the Reporter, I’ve learned that Redmond is a diverse community filled with people of all backgrounds and walks of life.

This is a town that supports and takes care of its own.

Whether that means crowdfunding to raise money for a struggling family, holding events to combat racism, coming together to figure out how to support those in the community who are homeless or on the verge of homelessness or simply posting a message on our social media pages to congratulate a sports team or individual athlete for a successful game or season, you come out and show up when it matters, Redmond.

And that is why it is with a slightly heavy heart that I must bid you goodbye.

That’s right, after six and a half years, I am leaving the Redmond Reporter.

I have accepted the position of editor for the Kirkland Reporter and Bothell-Kenmore Reporter newspapers with Sound Publishing (which also owns the Redmond Reporter) and I will begin my next journalistic adventures on Monday.

So after six and a half years, I just want to say thank you Redmond.

Thank you for welcoming me into your community, your businesses, your schools and your homes. You’ve allowed me to share your stories with the world and have been open to when I’ve shared a bit of my own with you.

A journalist’s life is not always easy — especially nowadays — so your support means more than you will probably ever realize.

But just because I will be leaving the paper, it doesn’t mean you will be completely rid of me. As Boyz II Men famously harmonized, “Although we’ve come to the end of the road/Still I can’t let you go.”

So don’t be surprised if you see me at Derby Days or Redmond Lights or at one of the summer concerts at Marymoor Park (sans notebook and or camera).

The events and activities I’ve covered during my tenure at the paper have become more than just part of the job and I look forward to the chance to attend them as a civilian — especially if another “I Love the ‘90s” concert comes to town (see the aforementioned Boyz II Men lyrics).

So, Redmond.

It’s been real. It’s been good.

Actually, it’s been real good and I look forward to learning about how the community continues to be a great place to live work and play.

Thanks again.

More in Opinion

KCLS: Much to celebrate from 2019 and in the year ahead

A column from the King County Library System.

Five reasons to love your recycling driver | Guest editorial

Maybe this year, consider that person who makes your life easier and helps keep our community clean, green, and safe all year long.

Defiant and determined Matt Shea is poised for a victory lap

The Republican state representative, linked to domestic terrorism, is not likely to get the boot.

Policy fights, political tension loom for state lawmakers

A 60-day session begins Monday. They’ll tackle car tabs, homelessness and whether to expel Matt Shea.

United Methodist Church: To split or not to split | Windows and Mirrors

Local clergy from Eastside United Methodist Churches weigh in on the church’s future regarding LGBTQ+ inclusion.

Better mental health care needed | Letter

Mayor Angela Birney’s vision statement was just released — “A connected community… Continue reading

Twenty recycling resolutions for 2020 | Guest editorial

Here are some tips for going green in the new year.

With five elections, get ready to vote a lot in 2020

It will be a busy year as voters decide the fate of school bonds and help choose the next president.

Accept the vote and move on | Letter to the editor

This is in response to “Affirmative action measure fails but could resurface… Continue reading

The best Christmas gift | Letter to the editor

At about 11 a.m. on Dec. 20, I was involved in a… Continue reading

Washington State Capitol Building in Olympia. File photo
Despite ruling on Public Records Act, we need to keep a close eye on Olympia

Washington Supreme Court upholds that state legislators are subject to the Public Records Act.