MAPS-MCRC serves people in need during Ramadan

During Ramadan, Muslims intensify their efforts to serve others, especially those in need.

  • Thursday, June 6, 2019 11:41am
  • Opinion

By Nickhath Sheriff

Special to the Reporter

Ramadan, the ninth month in the Islamic lunar calendar, is one of the most blessed months for us Muslims. It is the month that the Holy Quran was revealed to the Prophet Mohammad (Peace be upon Him).

The Holy Quran, which Muslims consider the absolute word of God, provides Muslims with guidance on how to live their lives in this world. This gives the month of Ramandan massive religious significance.

Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the Five Pillars of Islam. During this month, every Muslim who is healthy and able-bodied is required to fast, every day from dawn until dusk for 30 days.

Fasting is not just staying away from food or drinks but it’s an opportunity for spiritual cleansing, an opportunity to reflect, and re-discover one’s innermost self and come closer to God.

Along with the internal aspects of one’s spiritual renewal during this month, Ramadan also emphasizes service to others and mending relationships with friends and family. The month is a 30-day boot camp that trains us to be grateful, compassionate, and God-consciousness exercising — self-restraint, self-purification and motivating our spirit of caring and sharing for others

During this month Muslims, while focusing on their own internal spiritual renewal, also intensify their efforts to serve others, especially those in need. Fasting in Ramadan is about being patience, being grateful and giving back to those in need, deprived and hungry, while learning how to endure it patiently. This is a very humbling experience that we can use to empathize with those that are oppressed and needy within our own communities.

This year before the start of the month of Ramadan, the Muslim Community Resource Center (MCRC), which is the social and humanitarian services arm of the Muslim Association of Puget Sound (MAPS) in Redmond, along with the support of other mosques on the Eastside provided more than 1,000 needy families and individuals with care boxes — each containing food supplies for the whole month. Along with the food boxes, MAPS-MCRC also provided gifts to the kids in these families so that they can also enjoy the spirit of Ramadan. Additionally, several hundred toys and gifts along with scarves and caps — hand knitted by our seniors — were distributed to kids at the Seattle Children’s Hospital. MAPS-MCRC provided more than 300 hot meals to various tent cities and shelters in the Eastside during this month and also sponsored community dinners for several refugee communities in the greater Seattle area. Kids and youth in our community have assembled hundreds of gift goody bags that will be distributed to less fortunate kids on the occasion of Eid, which is a big day of celebration that marks the end of the month of Ramadan.

Fasting makes us realize how dependent our lives are on things that we often take for granted, such as food and water. It makes us realize that nothing is truly ours. This month increases our compassion and renews our spiritual energy. It truly makes us realize the reality of daily life for many who live in our communities.

Nickhath Sheriff is the founder and CEO of the Muslim Community Resource Center with the Muslim Association of Puget Sound.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@redmond-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.redmond-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in Opinion

Cartoon by Frank Shiers
Editorial: Let’s clear the air on wildfires, climate change

Agreement and commitment is needed to address the causes of wildfires and climate change.

Federal Way resident Bob Roegner is a former mayor of Auburn. Contact bjroegner@comcast.net.
What does it mean to violate the Hatch Act? | Roegner

The federal law was established in 1939.

Washington State Capitol Building in Olympia. File photo
Editorial: State lawmakers shouldn’t wait to start budget work

Making tough choices on cuts and revenue can’t wait until next year and hopes for better news.

Rico Thomas, left, has been a clerk in the Fuel Center/Mini Mart at Safeway in Federal Way for the past 5 years. Kyong Barry, right, has been with Albertsons for 18 years and is a front end supervisor in Auburn. Both are active members of UFCW 21. Courtesy photos
Grocery store workers deserve respect and hazard pay | Guest column

As grocery store workers in King County, we experience the hard, cold… Continue reading

Face masks save lives and jobs across Washington

Wearing a mask saves lives and saves jobs. And all across the… Continue reading

Cartoon by Frank Shiers
Editorial: Reopen schools in fall, but do it safely

Don’t bully schools into reopening. Protect our students.

Cartoon by Frank Shiers
Editorial: Stopping COVID is now up to each of us

With a resurgence threatening, we need to take greater responsibility to keep the virus in check.

Doreen Davis, left in mask, waves at parade participants on May 2. Olivia Sullivan/staff photo
Wear your face-hugging, ever-loving mask | Editorial

“Don’t make me come down there.” — New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo,… Continue reading

Back to the wild — a whole new outdoor recreation world | Guest editorial

When enjoying the great outdoors, continue to socially distance and be aware of how else COVID-19 has changed our world.

Earth Month 2020 and COVID-19: Caring for the planet and each other

Here are some ways to minimize your carbon footprint and protect the planet amid the pandemic.

KCLS is stepping up its commitment to patrons

KCLS has expanding its online resources so patrons can continue to learn, build skills, stay entertained and remain mentally and physically active amid the pandemic.

The true meaning of community | Guest editorial

LWTech president Dr. Amy Morrison reflects on how the COVID-19 outbreak has brought the community together.