Trade Chic brings pretty, plus-sized fashions to downtown Redmond

Beauty comes in all shapes and sizes. So it's refreshing that a new, downtown Redmond boutique is specializing in pretty, plus-sized fashions, both new and used. Trade Chic recently opened at 16508 Redmond Way.

Mother and daughter Cindy (left) and Lindsey Kremkau have opened the Trade Chic boutique at 16508 Redmond Way. The downtown Redmond shop carries the latest fashions in sizes 16 and up.

Beauty comes in all shapes and sizes. So it’s refreshing that a new, downtown Redmond boutique is specializing in pretty, plus-sized fashions, both new and used.

Trade Chic recently opened at 16508 Redmond Way. Right now, about 60 percent of Trade Chic’s stock is new ladies’ clothing in U.S. sizes 16-28, from designers based in London. Gently worn plus-sized fashions account for the other 40 percent of merchandise at Trade Chic.

Trade Chic’s audience is women ages 18 to 35 who want to wear the latest styles but have limited choices because of their size. Many popular clothing chains don’t carry larger sizes. Among those that do, the plus-sized selections are often matronly, more expensive or both.

“The goal here is to have a store where skinny people are jealous,” said Trade Chic owner Lindsey Kremkau, who runs the boutique with her mom Cindy Kremkau.

“We’ve got classic styles that anyone would find cute, regardless of age or size,” Lindsey said.

And nothing in the store costs more than $100, Cindy noted.

“New clothes are mostly in the $40 range. Used items may be a little over $20. It’s good quality, but affordable. We can mix and match new and used pieces to pull together a fun, funky outfit,” said Cindy.

Bringing East Coast chic to Seattle’s Eastside, but in a more accommodating size range, was a natural progression for Lindsey.

After graduating from Woodinville High School, Lindsey attended Marymount Manhattan College, then worked as a fashion publicist in Manhattan.

If you’ve read the book “The Devil Wears Prada,” or seen the movie, you’d know that the story’s heroine is ridiculed for being “a 6,” which is hardly a shocking size.

Alas, New York’s fashion circle really is that shallow, said Lindsey.

“Everyone there was a size 0,” she said, shaking her head.

High-fashion models were like freaks of nature, she added.

“No one looks like that, normally,” Lindsey accurately pointed out.

Yet although most women have much fuller figures than those models, to look at the covers of Cosmo and Vogue, there’s a definite disconnect.

It’s no wonder that “real” females, including high school girls from the Old Fire House Teen Center on the next block, are finding their way to Trade Chic and eagerly spreading the word among their friends that you don’t have to be a size 0 to buy cute clothes.

“We’re getting lots of prom dresses, as well as career wear,” said Lindsey.

They’ll also carry plus-sized swimsuits all year around, in a surprisingly affordable price range of $40-50.

As well as appealing to an underserved population, the ladies at Trade Chic look forward to networking with other female boutique owners in the neighborhood and making downtown Redmond a true shopping destination.

Each time a new shipment of clothes come in, Trade Chic will host special events such as wine tastings and informal fashion shows. They hope like-minded business owners will collaborate with them on activities such as “fashion walks.”

Trade Chic’s current business hours are 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Friday; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday; and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.

For more information, call (425) 376-0600 or visit www.tradechic.net.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@redmond-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.redmond-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in Business

A new measure from the King County Council could increase flexibility for businesses in rural areas of King County. File photo
County measure would increase flexibility for businesses in rural areas

Staff report Legislation the King County Council passed June 23 could lead… Continue reading

Snoqualmie Casino is located at 37500 SE North Bend Way, Snoqualmie. Courtesy photo
Snoqualmie Casino reopens June 11 with social distancing, other safety measures

Staff report Snoqualmie Casino will reopen to the general public at 6… Continue reading

Like similar businesses across King, Snohomish and Pierce counties, Bothell restaurant Hana Sushi closed due to public-health concerns. Sound Publishing file photo
Inslee changes course, says diners won’t have to sign in

Restaurants may still ask customers for information that contact tracers could use to stop an outbreak.

Businesses, nonprofits asked to participate in COVID-19 impact survey

Regional effort in King, Snohomish and Pierce counties

From the frontlines: Tips for recycling right in Redmond

A monthly column by Waste Management.

Construction worker installs siding to a building in Snoqualmie. File photo
Inslee gives construction a green light

It was unclear when sites would re-open, but employees will have to have PPE and stay six feet apart.

Report shows severity of COVID-19 impacts on hotels nationwide

70% of employees laid off or furloughed, eight in 10 hotel rooms empty

State processes record number of applications for unemployment benefits

Employment Security Department had challenges with the volume

Cantwell calls for nationwide support for local media hurt by COVID-19 pandemic

Remarks come on Senate floor: ‘We need the media. …and need to help them’

Gyms, fitness centers must allow members to cancel memberships or face legal consequences

State attorney general responds to consumer complaints during COVID-19 outbreak