Geneva Woods, a former resident of Life Care Center of Kirkland, enjoys homemade potato soup while staying at Harborview Medical Center, which she requests from her family daily. Photo courtesy of Kate Neidigh

Geneva Woods, a former resident of Life Care Center of Kirkland, enjoys homemade potato soup while staying at Harborview Medical Center, which she requests from her family daily. Photo courtesy of Kate Neidigh

90-year-old Life Care resident recovering after testing positive for COVID-19

Geneva Wood remains in isolation at Harborview Medical Center.

After testing positive for coronavirus earlier this month, Geneva Wood now appears to be on the mend.

The 90-year-old was a resident at Life Care Center of Kirkland and brought to the long-term care facility in January after she had a stroke.

By mid to late February, when coronavirus (COVID-19) cases began to surface stateside, Wood was struck with a fever and her family members became immediately concerned.

By March 5, Wood was transferred over to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle and got tested for the coronavirus. By the following day, the test results came back positive.

Wood’s family members, which include her four living children, 11 grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren describe her as a “bat out of hell,” due to her will to live. After her stroke, Wood regained the capability to walk, use her right arm and speak.

While at Harborview, Wood’s four children rushed to her side to support her amidst the pandemic, but the closest they could get to their mother was outside of her room, with a barrier in between. As her symptoms worsened, Wood relayed to her daughter, Cami Neidigh, through the door’s glass window, “I’m going to fight this for my family and make everyone proud.”

At this point in time, Wood’s doctors had little hope for her recovery. Her children suited up in personal protective equipment and went into the room to say their final goodbyes.

“It was a gift and at the same time cruel,” Neidigh said. “We could touch her hand, rub her arm through the gloves. No hugging.”

Wood was moved to a new room with another patient who had also tested positive for COVID-19.

Suddenly, her symptoms began to improve. By March 17, Wood was fully off of an oxygen tank and she had few symptoms remaining. That same day, she tested negative for coronavirus and as of March 18, she still had a stuffy nose and some coughing.

Her doctors relayed that Wood needs to be asymptomatic for 72 hours before she can be cleared and discharged.

The family is waiting for another negative test result which will take place on March 20 or 21. Once Wood is discharged, the family plans to keep her in isolation at home and away from others for public safety precautions.

“I feel it’s important to give people some hope. Getting this virus is not a death sentence for the elderly or anybody,” said Neidigh.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@redmond-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.redmond-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

Geneva Woods, a former resident of Life Care Center of Kirkland, enjoys homemade potato soup while staying at Harborview Medical Center, which she requests from her family daily. Photo courtesy of Kate Neidigh

Geneva Woods, a former resident of Life Care Center of Kirkland, enjoys homemade potato soup while staying at Harborview Medical Center, which she requests from her family daily. Photo courtesy of Kate Neidigh

More in News

Screenshot
King County weather: Dec. 3-5

Here is your King County area weather forecast for Dec. 3-5, 2021.… Continue reading

Keith Wagoner
Senator becomes first GOP candidate for secretary of state

Sen. Keith Wagoner will challenge Democrat Steve Hobbs, who was appointed to the statewide post in November

The Federal Way Performing Arts and Event Center is located at 31510 Pete von Reichbauer Way S. Olivia Sullivan/the Mirror
FEMA to send mobile COVID-19 vaccination unit to Western Washington

The mobile site is set to open Dec. 20 in Federal Way; additional locations to come.

Courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Washington health officials discuss response to new COVID variant

Things will be handled with Omicron variant similar to the Delta variant.

Aftermath of crash at intersection of NE Woodinville Duvall Road and West Snoqualmie Valley Road (Screenshot from King County Sheriff's Office Facebook account)
Teen walks away from horrible crash in rural East King County

First responders found the overturned and crushed vehicle abandoned near Duvall.

File photo
As new COVID-19 variant looms, vaccination disparities linger in King County

County data shows gaps among age, geography and race.

King County Councilmember Reagan Dunn
King County Councilmember Dunn will challenge Rep. Kim Schrier for U.S. Congress seat

The current County Councilmember would be following in his late mother’s footsteps

Redmond Mayor Angela Birney (center) cuts the ceremonial ribbon (courtesy of City of Redmond)
Newly renovated Westside Park now open to public

The park includes new amenities such as walking trails, sports courts and a zip line.

Garbage at the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill in Maple Valley. FILE PHOTO
King County and Port of Seattle to collaborate on waste-to-fuel study

The study is aimed at identifying logistics of developing aviation fuel out of municipal garbage.

Most Read