Fresh and frisky

King County’s Marymoor Park is a magnet for animal lovers — and now there’s a new attraction: A deluxe, self-serve dog wash facility across from the off-leash area and community garden section, also known as the Pea Patch. Entering from West Lake Sammamish Parkway, follow the signs to Wash Spot.

Ron Soukup grins as his dog

Ron Soukup grins as his dog

King County’s Marymoor Park is a magnet for animal lovers — and now there’s a new attraction: A deluxe, self-serve dog wash facility across from the off-leash area and community garden section, also known as the Pea Patch. Entering from West Lake Sammamish Parkway, follow the signs to Wash Spot.

Wash Spot quietly started up in mid-April and will celebrate its grand opening on Sunday, May 18. That day, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m., the eight-minute “Spot Wash,” perfect for small dogs, will cost just $5 and the 14-minute “Max Wash,” tailored to larger dogs, will sell for $7. Proceeds from the grand opening will go toward pet food at food banks.

Regular prices for the Spot Wash and Max Wash are $8.75 and $13.50. All sales transactions are through Visa, MasterCard or Discover Card. For safety reasons, attendants will not have cash on the premises.

Mark Hidaka, who co-owns Wash Spot with his wife Dina Hidaka, and Mark Inahara, explained that the seven-stall wash station includes ramps so people don’t have to hoist heavy animals into the waist-length cleaning tubs. Another convenience is Wash Spot’s patent-pending soaping system that evenly dispenses herbal and hypoallergenic shampoos especially formulated for dogs.

The soaping and rinsing cycles are “timed and very intuitive,” like what you’d see in a self-serve car wash, Hidaka noted. The water temperature is just right for a dog’s sensitive skin, as is the temperature of the blow dryers to finish off the pet grooming process.

The co-owners also operate Ruff House in downtown Redmond. Loyal patrons from that nine-year-old business are discovering Wash Spot, along with curious newcomers who see it from a nearby parking lot. Now, whether running errands in town, or taking in fresh air and exercise at the park, humans don’t have to wrestle with a fussy pet or make a mess at home.

And “by cultivating strong relationships with non-profit, corporate and community partners, King County Parks enhance park amenities while reducing costs,” said Doug Williams, media representative for King County Parks.

Current hours for Wash Spot are 10 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. Hours will be extended during the summer.

For information, call (425) 556-9297.




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