Students get close-up look at adoptable pets

On Wednesday, a visit from the MaxMobile gave kids at Horace Mann Elementary a close-up look at some adoptable animals that might benefit from their ongoing pet supply drive. The Humane Society for Seattle/King County brings the cheery yellow bus filled with cute critters to schools, public parks and special events to educate people about the huge numbers of dogs, cats, hamsters and other small animals needing loving care.

  • Thursday, April 10, 2008 4:46pm
  • News

Fourth grade student Kaija Gibson pets “Fudge

On Wednesday, a visit from the MaxMobile gave kids at Horace Mann Elementary a close-up look at some adoptable animals that might benefit from their ongoing pet supply drive. The Humane Society for Seattle/King County brings the cheery yellow bus filled with cute critters to schools, public parks and special events to educate people about the huge numbers of dogs, cats, hamsters and other small animals needing loving care.

It’s named after a Humane Society board member’s dog, Max, noted Dr. Sandy Willis, medical director for the society.

Before children toured the MaxMobile, they learned about the Humane Society’s mission from its director of education, Kate Reedy. She spoke while a volunteer, Nancy Graham of Kirkland, led her dog Mai Lei around the Mann library so kids could pet her.

Reedy explained that they’re a non-profit organization that exists to make animals happy, heal sick animals and place them in permanent homes. Six thousand to 8,000 homeless animals come through this chapter of the Humane Society each year and it costs about $2 million annually to save them.

“We believe there’s the perfect home for every animal and we’ll keep these as animals as long as we need to,” she added.

A child asked, “What about the animals you don’t have room for?”

Reedy explained that volunteers take them home — “it’s called fostering.”

About 50 percent of the animals are strays and the other 50 percent are “surrendered” by their owners for reasons such as allergies, an unplanned litter, a new apartment that doesn’t allow pets, or because having a pet is more work or more expensive than they expected.

Adopting animals at the Humane Society is inexpensive, considering that they already have all the immunizations they need, have been spayed or neutered and behavior-tested to make sure they’re a good match for the prospective pet owners, said Willis.

Donations of cash and pet supplies – such as items being collected at Mann — not only keep the animals well-fed and comfortable while they’re waiting to be adopted, but the Humane Society also has a pet food bank for elderly people and AIDS patients who need animal companions and can’t afford the upkeep.

“We’re asking for dog and cat food, canned or dry, litter, blankets, towels and toys,” explained Mann librarian Lynn Detweiler who oversees the school’s Spirit Team. Last semester, the group supported a sister school in Uganda. This semester, she wanted to find a service project that was relevant to the local community and also could be tied to a visit from author Peg Kehret, who often writes about animals.

Kehret was scheduled to visit Mann on Friday, but was ill and will come another day.

Donations to the pet supply drive can be dropped off during regular school hours through Friday, April 18. Mann Elementary is located at 17001 NE 104th St. Call (425) 881-9696 for details.

To learn more about visits from the MaxMobile, e-mail shsservices@seattlehumane.org.

For inquiries about pet adoptions, e-mail adoption@seattlehumane.org, call (425) 649-7563 or visit the Humane Society for Seattle/King County, 13212 SE Eastgate Way, Bellevue. The society is closed Mondays and Tuesdays, but adoptions are available from noon-6 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@redmond-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.redmond-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Governor Jay Inslee smiles and laughs Sept. 3, 2019, during a speech at the Lynnwood Link Extension groundbreaking in Lynnwood. A Thurston County judge ruled he exceeded his authority when he vetoed single sentences in the state transportation budget in 2019. (Olivia Vanni / Herald file)
Judge invalidates Gov. Inslee’s veto in roads budget

Lawmakers said the governor crossed a constitutional line.

King County cases among younger adults drives increase in COVID-19 numbers

Over half of all new cases are among people ages 20-39

Kirkland man found guilty of promoting prostitution in Eastside sex trafficking ring

Authorities say suspect ran “successful enterprise” for greater half of a decade.

Public and private universities, colleges, technical schools, apprenticeship programs and similar schools and programs may resume general instruction, including in-person classes and lectures, starting Aug. 1. Pictured: The University of Washington-Bothell campus. File photo
Universities and colleges may reopen in fall, governor says

His order requires masks and physical distancing, among other measures, to help prevent infections.

During a recent training, South King Fire and Rescue members at Station 62 wear personal protective gear, which includes face masks, eye protection, gloves and gowns. Courtesy photo
Governor orders statewide use of face coverings in public

Jay Inslee says that until there is a vaccine, it’s the best weapon to stop the spread of COVID-19.

File photo/pexels.com
Renton man pleads guilty to one of state’s largest workers’ comp scams

The delivery driver was still working under his own name while receiving L&I pension, and owes the state almost $340,000.

Tommy Smith in 2013. File photo
Redmond fire chief resigns

Deputy Fire Chief Don Horton will fulfill the role in the interim.

Courtesy image
Task force will tackle issues of racial justice, police reform

Inslee names civil rights activists, pastors, and cops to panel that may forge ideas for new laws

Inslee forms state task force to address policing and racial justice

24 members includes families who have lost loved ones; police officials

Snoqualmie Library. File photo
Libraries take first steps towards reopening

Curbside service and book returns are returning in the coming weeks.

King County Board of Health declares racism a crisis

Racism was declared a public health crisis by King County’s Board of… Continue reading

State Capitol Building, Olympia, Washington. File photo
Tax collections tumble as state braces for huge budget hole

Inslee cancels pay raises for some execs and orders furloughs for workers as special session looms.